November 1988
Volume 29, Issue 11
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Articles  |   November 1988
Corneal endothelial changes following minor trauma.
Author Affiliations
  • H Fukami
    Department of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
  • R A Laing
    Department of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
  • K Tsubota
    Department of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
  • K Chiba
    Department of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
  • S S Oak
    Department of Ophthalmology, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science November 1988, Vol.29, 1677-1682. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      H Fukami, R A Laing, K Tsubota, K Chiba, S S Oak; Corneal endothelial changes following minor trauma.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(11):1677-1682.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The healing processes that occur when corneal endothelial cells are subjected to only mild trauma are not known. To study these processes we have developed a system that enables only a few endothelial cells to be traumatized or destroyed under continuous specular microscopic observation in vitro. Experiments in which a small group of cells were traumatized by gentle wounding with a microglass tip produced an immediate and distinct dark area having the same size as the tip. Using this method we have produced and observed two types of wound by controlling the force of wounding. The first type of wound, produced by a gentle touch, recovered within 1 hr. The second type of wound, produced by moderate touch, took about 24 hr to recover completely from the trauma. In the second type of wound, we observed migration, elongation, coalescence and mitosis during the healing process. Histological examination revealed that in the first type of wound, the cells remained intact with no apparent damage seen by vital staining and light microscopy. For the second type of wound, the cells were completely missing although there was no apparent damage to Descemet's membrane.

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