July 1988
Volume 29, Issue 7
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Articles  |   July 1988
The distribution and kinetics of visual pigments in the cat retina.
Author Affiliations
  • C M Kemp
    Department of Visual Science, Institute of Ophthalmology, London, England.
  • D J Faulkner
    Department of Visual Science, Institute of Ophthalmology, London, England.
  • S G Jacobson
    Department of Visual Science, Institute of Ophthalmology, London, England.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1988, Vol.29, 1056-1065. doi:
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      C M Kemp, D J Faulkner, S G Jacobson; The distribution and kinetics of visual pigments in the cat retina.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(7):1056-1065.

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Abstract

An imaging fundus reflectometer has been used to study the distribution and regeneration of visual pigments in the retina of the adult living cat. Measurements were made over an area of tapetal retina extending 25 degrees nasal and 40 degrees temporal to the area centralis on the horizontal meridian and 5 degrees inferior to 40 degrees superior on the vertical meridian. The measured density differences show large variations with retinal location, with values in the central retina up to 60% higher than those in the superior region. The area of high density differences forms a horizontal streak. There are two peaks of density difference values, one centered on the area centralis and the second in the nasal section of the streak. Spectral measurements indicate that the contribution of cone pigments is negligible everywhere except at the area centralis, where it is about 5%. The distribution of density differences is shown to correlate well with anatomical data if the effects of fundal stray light are taken into account and if it is assumed that the cross section of light capture by the rods is determined by the dimensions of the inner segments. The time required for essentially complete regeneration of rhodopsin depends on retinal location, varying from about 80 min in the superior retina to more than 90 min in the regions of peak densities.

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