August 1989
Volume 30, Issue 8
Free
Articles  |   August 1989
The morphology and function of healing cat corneal endothelium.
Author Affiliations
  • P T Huang
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905.
  • L R Nelson
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905.
  • W M Bourne
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science August 1989, Vol.30, 1794-1801. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      P T Huang, L R Nelson, W M Bourne; The morphology and function of healing cat corneal endothelium.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1989;30(8):1794-1801.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

We mechanically damaged the entire corneal endothelium of one eye of each of ten cats and then examined both eyes by fluorophotometry and specular microscopy for 5 months. Six weeks after damage, when the corneas had cleared sufficiently to make accurate measurements, the mean endothelial permeability to carboxyfluorescein was increased 11% (P = 0.02) and the mean central corneal thickness was increased 11% (P = 0.05) in the damaged eyes. The mean endothelial pump rate was decreased 29% (P = 0.05), indicating that the increase in permeability was insufficient to explain the increase in thickness. The permeability returned to normal by 3 months and the pump rate by 5 months. Six weeks after damage, the mean endothelial cell size was increased 89% (P less than 0.01), the mean coefficient of variation of cell size was increased 200% (P less than 0.01), and the mean percentage of hexagonal cells was decreased 34% (P less than 0.01). By 5 months, the mean cell size had changed very little, and none of the three morphologic measurements had returned to normal. As in rabbits, the endothelial barrier in cats recovers before the pump after wounding. Unlike in rabbits, functional recovery in cats requires at least several months. Such prolonged functional recovery after endothelial trauma might also be expected in humans who, like cats and unlike rabbits, have little capacity for endothelial mitosis during healing.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×