September 1991
Volume 32, Issue 10
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Articles  |   September 1991
Characterization of a murine model of recurrent herpes simplex viral keratitis induced by ultraviolet B radiation.
Author Affiliations
  • K A Laycock
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.
  • S F Lee
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.
  • R H Brady
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.
  • J S Pepose
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 1991, Vol.32, 2741-2746. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      K A Laycock, S F Lee, R H Brady, J S Pepose; Characterization of a murine model of recurrent herpes simplex viral keratitis induced by ultraviolet B radiation.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1991;32(10):2741-2746.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The authors characterized a murine model of herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation in which recurrent herpetic keratitis was obtained in up to 80% of animals. Five weeks after ganglionic latency was established in National Institutes of Health inbred mice after corneal inoculation, HSV type 1 (HSV-1) was reactivated by irradiating the previously inoculated eye with ultraviolet (UV) light. Comparison of different UV wavelengths showed UVB to be optimal for reactivation, with peak viral recurrence being induced by a total exposure of approximately 250 mJ/cm2. Reactivated infectious virus generally began to appear in trigeminal ganglia 2 days postirradiation and was subsequently detectable in the cornea by both corneal swabbing and immunostaining for viral antigens. Two consecutive outbreaks of viral recurrence at the ocular surface were induced in selected animals by serial exposure to UVB. Advantages of this model over other models of recurrent keratitis are discussed.

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