May 1991
Volume 32, Issue 6
Free
Articles  |   May 1991
Effect of chronic near-ultraviolet radiation on the gray squirrel lens in vivo.
Author Affiliations
  • S Zigman
    Ophthalmology Research Laboratory, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York.
  • T Paxhia
    Ophthalmology Research Laboratory, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York.
  • T McDaniel
    Ophthalmology Research Laboratory, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York.
  • M F Lou
    Ophthalmology Research Laboratory, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York.
  • N T Yu
    Ophthalmology Research Laboratory, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, New York.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1991, Vol.32, 1723-1732. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      S Zigman, T Paxhia, T McDaniel, M F Lou, N T Yu; Effect of chronic near-ultraviolet radiation on the gray squirrel lens in vivo.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1991;32(6):1723-1732.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

The effects of ambient exposure to near-ultraviolet (near-UV) radiation (300-400 nm) on the ocular lens of the diurnal squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) are reported. Gray squirrels lived in cages illuminated for 12 hr a day with near-UV light (6 mW/cm2, 365 nm) for 1 yr. The non-UV-exposed controls were housed separately. In the lenses of UV-exposed animals, anterior pole changes occurred. Central epithelial cells swelled, disappeared, or underwent proliferation. A band of disoriented degenerating fiber cells was seen in the midcortex, with a degree of liquefaction. When lens protein compartments were separated by centrifugation, water-insoluble but urea-soluble fractions were enhanced in the outer and inner cortex and the nucleus. Both high-performance liquid chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that proteins mainly in the midcortex and nucleus were altered considerably. Evidence of a loss of sulfhydryl compounds (by chemical and Raman spectroscopic analyses) and an increase of protein-thiol mixed disulfides (chemically) was also observed. These data prove that repetitive ambient exposure of diurnal animals to near-UV radiation at subsolar levels damages the lens by interfering with the maintenance of epithelial cells and altering the structural proteins; some of this may be due to the conversion of sulfhydryls to mixed disulfides.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×