April 1991
Volume 32, Issue 5
Free
Articles  |   April 1991
Acuity-luminance and foveal increment threshold functions in retinitis pigmentosa.
Author Affiliations
  • K R Alexander
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois, Chicago College of Medicine 60612.
  • D J Derlacki
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois, Chicago College of Medicine 60612.
  • G A Fishman
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois, Chicago College of Medicine 60612.
  • N S Peachey
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Illinois, Chicago College of Medicine 60612.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 1991, Vol.32, 1446-1454. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      K R Alexander, D J Derlacki, G A Fishman, N S Peachey; Acuity-luminance and foveal increment threshold functions in retinitis pigmentosa.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1991;32(5):1446-1454.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Acuity-luminance functions and foveal increment threshold functions were measured in 20 subjects with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) who had Snellen acuities of 20/40 or better, minimal or no posterior subcapsular cataracts, and no atrophic-appearing foveal lesions. Compared with the results from ten normal subjects, the visual acuities of the RP subjects were reduced at all luminance levels; the acuity deficits were more pronounced at low luminances. Foveal detection thresholds of the RP subjects showed the greatest elevation at low background luminances and approached normal values at high adapting levels. There was a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.79, P less than 0.01) between the visual acuities and absolute thresholds of the RP subjects. The overall pattern of results cannot be explained by a reduced quantal absorption in foveal cones, but it is consistent with the hypothesis that a reduced cone spatial density is the primary mechanism of foveal visual loss in this group of RP subjects.

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