January 1991
Volume 32, Issue 1
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Articles  |   January 1991
Extraocular muscle regeneration in freeze-treated extraocular muscle autografts.
Author Affiliations
  • S P Christiansen
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kentucky, Lexington.
  • R S Baker
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kentucky, Lexington.
  • M Madhat
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Kentucky, Lexington.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1991, Vol.32, 154-159. doi:
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      S P Christiansen, R S Baker, M Madhat; Extraocular muscle regeneration in freeze-treated extraocular muscle autografts.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1991;32(1):154-159.

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Abstract

New growth of extraocular muscle has been demonstrated in degenerating peripheral nerve autografts implanted between two extraocular muscles. This suggests that extraocular muscle may be lengthened for therapeutic purposes if a suitable matrix can be found to support this new growth. Investigators of peripheral nerve regeneration have found that the basal lamina of freeze-killed skeletal muscle remains intact and supports axonal regeneration. This study was designed to investigate the feasibility of inducing regenerative growth of extraocular muscle in freeze-treated extraocular muscle autografts. In six beagles the inferior oblique muscle was removed from both orbits, frozen in liquid nitrogen, and allowed to thaw at room temperature. The freeze-thaw cycle was repeated. The freeze-treated grafts were then sewn in an end-to-end fashion between the cut end of the lateral rectus and the globe. At both 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, three dogs were killed, and the grafts were removed from both orbits. These were prepared for light and electron microscopic examination. This revealed robust growth of mature-appearing, innervated muscle fibers in the proximal graft that could be differentiated by adenosine triphosphatase histochemistry. Rare, immature fibers were seen in the distal graft. These results demonstrate that freeze-treated extraocular muscle autografts support regenerative growth of extraocular muscle.

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