April 1991
Volume 32, Issue 5
Free
Articles  |   April 1991
Differences in response in vivo to amphotericin B among Candida albicans strains.
Author Affiliations
  • D M O'Day
    Department of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.
  • W A Ray
    Department of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.
  • R D Robinson
    Department of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.
  • W S Head
    Department of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.
  • T E Williams
    Department of Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 1991, Vol.32, 1569-1572. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      D M O'Day, W A Ray, R D Robinson, W S Head, T E Williams; Differences in response in vivo to amphotericin B among Candida albicans strains.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1991;32(5):1569-1572.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

A group of ten Candida albicans strains previously determined to be resistant or susceptible to topical amphotericin B in vivo and in vitro were exposed to treatment with different concentrations of the drug in a quantitative model of candidal keratitis in Dutch-belted rabbits. After 5 days of topical treatment with amphotericin B eye drops in concentrations of 0.3%, 0.03%, or 0.003%, quantitative isolate recovery in treated animals was compared with that of untreated controls. A dose response was observed for all five susceptible strains. The two strains that were most sensitive to amphotericin B in vitro also were the most susceptible in vivo. At each dose level there was a two- to eightfold reduction in isolate recovery among highly susceptible strains compared with less susceptible strains (P less than 0.05). The five resistant strains remained so even when the 0.3% concentration was used. Among strains of C. albicans susceptible to amphotericin B, there appeared to be a variation in degree of susceptibility in vivo that correlated with the minimum inhibitory concentration.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×