October 1994
Volume 35, Issue 11
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Articles  |   October 1994
Noncontact, two-dimensional measurement of retinal microcirculation using laser speckle phenomenon.
Author Affiliations
  • Y Tamaki
    Eye Clinic, Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Japan.
  • M Araie
    Eye Clinic, Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Japan.
  • E Kawamoto
    Eye Clinic, Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Japan.
  • S Eguchi
    Eye Clinic, Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Japan.
  • H Fujii
    Eye Clinic, Tokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Hospital, Japan.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1994, Vol.35, 3825-3834. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Y Tamaki, M Araie, E Kawamoto, S Eguchi, H Fujii; Noncontact, two-dimensional measurement of retinal microcirculation using laser speckle phenomenon.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1994;35(11):3825-3834.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To report a new apparatus for noncontact, two-dimensional measurement of retinal microcirculation using the laser speckle phenomenon and to demonstrate that this apparatus can document known or expected changes in retinal blood flow. METHODS: The rabbit fundus was illuminated by an argon (blue) laser spot (0.62 x 0.62 mm), and its image speckle was detected with an image sensor. The difference between the average of the speckle intensity (Imean) and the speckle intensity for successive scannings was calculated, and the ratio of Imean to this difference was defined as normalized blur (NB), a quantitative index of blood velocity in the retinal microcirculation. The results were displayed on a color monitor showing the two-dimensional variation of the NB level in the measurement area. Using this apparatus in the rabbit, the NB in the retinal field free of visible surface vessels was determined and compared with the retinal blood flow rate measured using the microsphere technique in the same eye simultaneously. In addition, the effect of the ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) on NB was studied. In the above experiments, a stepwise reduction in OPP was introduced by elevating the intraocular pressure manometrically. RESULTS: The relative decrease in the average NB (NBav) over the field measured, with the reduction in OPP, showed significant correlation with the relative change in the blood flow rate determined using the microsphere technique (r = 0.59, P < 0.001). Although NBav in the retina was little affected by OPP change when OPP was greater than 50 mm Hg, NB decreased along with OPP at levels less than 50 mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: The NBav showed significant correlation with the retinal blood flow rate determined with microsphere technique. Retinal microcirculation under various conditions can be studied two dimensionally and noninvasively in the living eye with the present apparatus.

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