August 1994
Volume 35, Issue 9
Free
Articles  |   August 1994
Immunolocalization of integrins in the human retina.
Author Affiliations
  • R B Brem
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-4197.
  • S G Robbins
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-4197.
  • D J Wilson
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-4197.
  • L M O'Rourke
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-4197.
  • R N Mixon
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-4197.
  • J E Robertson
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-4197.
  • S R Planck
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-4197.
  • J T Rosenbaum
    Department of Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-4197.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science August 1994, Vol.35, 3466-3474. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      R B Brem, S G Robbins, D J Wilson, L M O'Rourke, R N Mixon, J E Robertson, S R Planck, J T Rosenbaum; Immunolocalization of integrins in the human retina.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1994;35(9):3466-3474.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Integrins are cell surface proteins that participate in interactions between cells and with extracellular matrix. Binding of integrins to their ligands influences cell activities including proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Expression of integrin subunits from three different subfamilies were examined in human retina. METHODS: Integrins were detected in frozen sections of two human retinas with an avidin-biotin-complex immunohistochemical technique, using nine different monoclonal antibodies specific for alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5, alpha 6, alpha v, beta 1, beta 2, and beta 3. One retina was from a patient who had conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma, and the other was from uninvolved regions of an eye with a choroidal melanoma. RESULTS: All integrins tested were detectable in consistent patterns in two retinas. All except alpha 2 and alpha 4 were stained vibrantly in retinal and choroidal vessels. All alpha subunit staining of vessels showed overlap or close proximity to beta 1 staining. In addition to vessels, beta 1 was also present in the internal limiting membrane; alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 4, alpha 5, and beta 2 were all found throughout much of the neural retina, albeit with distinctive staining patterns. Other than in association with vessels, alpha 6 and alpha v were not detected in neural retina, and beta 3 was only weakly detected in the nerve fiber layer; alpha 4 and beta 2 were expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium; beta 1 and beta 2 were strongly expressed in drusen present in one of the eyes. CONCLUSION: Nine integrin subunits have been found to have unique distributions in adult human retina. An understanding of the distribution in normal retina can serve as a useful contrast to patterns of staining associated with retinal diseases.

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