August 1994
Volume 35, Issue 9
Free
Articles  |   August 1994
Foveal vision function before and after fluorescein angiography.
Author Affiliations
  • N Friedman
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco, CA 94115.
  • G Haegerstrom-Portnoy
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco, CA 94115.
  • O Paul
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco, CA 94115.
  • A Jampolsky
    Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco, CA 94115.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science August 1994, Vol.35, 3566-3570. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      N Friedman, G Haegerstrom-Portnoy, O Paul, A Jampolsky; Foveal vision function before and after fluorescein angiography.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1994;35(9):3566-3570.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Fluorescein angiography is routinely used in ophthalmologic practice with minimal changes in vision reported by the patient after the procedure. Recent animal work has suggested that fluorescein may be cytotoxic in the presence of light and may cause retinal damage. The authors examined whether any changes occur in foveal vision function after fluorescein angiography. METHODS: A battery of tests of vision function--including visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, color vision, and two-color increment thresholds designed to isolate individual cone pathways--was administered before and 48 hours after fluorescein angiography to a group of 10 patients with good visual acuity. RESULTS: Most of the patients showed significant abnormalities with the nonstandard tests; however, no significant changes in central vision function were found 48 hours after fluorescein angiography. CONCLUSION: Even sensitive vision tests show no measurable effect of fluorescein angiography on foveal vision function in eyes with significant disease.

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