February 1995
Volume 36, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   February 1995
Neonatal lensectomy and intraocular lens implantation: effects in rhesus monkeys.
Author Affiliations
  • S R Lambert
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • A Fernandes
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • H Grossniklaus
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • C Drews-Botsch
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • H Eggers
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • R G Boothe
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1995, Vol.36, 300-310. doi:
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      S R Lambert, A Fernandes, H Grossniklaus, C Drews-Botsch, H Eggers, R G Boothe; Neonatal lensectomy and intraocular lens implantation: effects in rhesus monkeys.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1995;36(2):300-310.

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To compare the effects of a lensectomy with and without intraocular lens (IOL) implantation on a neonatal rhesus monkey eye. METHODS: A lensectomy and anterior vitrectomy was performed on 75 monkeys during the first 16 days of life; 21 of these monkeys also had an IOL implanted into the posterior chamber. The eyes were examined at regular intervals using biomicroscopy, applanation tonometry, and ophthalmoscopy. RESULTS: The pseudophakic monkeys were studied until they were 92.5 +/- 5.8 weeks of age and the aphakic monkeys until they were 80.4 +/- 5.7 weeks of age. Pupillary membranes (100% versus 55.5%; P < 0.01) and lens regeneration into the pupillary aperture (28.6% versus 5.6%; P = 0.02) occurred more often in the pseudophakic than the aphakic eyes. As a result, the pseudophakic eyes required more reoperations than the aphakic eyes to keep the visual axis clear (P < 0.01). There was not a significant difference in the incidence of ocular hypertension between the pseudophakic and aphakic eyes (9.5% versus 12.7%; P = 0.34). Pupillary capture of the IOL optic occurred in 52% and haptic breakage in 33% of the pseudophakic eyes. All of the eyes with broken haptics had a prominent Soemmerring's ring varying in maximum thickness from 0.6 to 2 mm. Nine of the haptics from the seven eyes with broken IOLs had eroded into the iris, two into the ciliary body, and one into the anterior chamber. CONCLUSIONS: Implanting an IOL into a neonatal monkey eye after a lensectomy and anterior vitrectomy increases the likelihood of a reoperation being necessary. Haptics frequently erode into the iris and ciliary body and may break because of stress placed on the optic-haptic junction by forward movement of the IOL.

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