March 1995
Volume 36, Issue 3
Free
Articles  |   March 1995
Histopathology, morphometry, and nuclear DNA content of iris melanocytic lesions.
Author Affiliations
  • H E Grossniklaus
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • J H Oakman
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • C Cohen
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • F P Calhoun, Jr
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • P B DeRose
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • C Drews-Botsch
    Department of Ophthalmology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 1995, Vol.36, 745-750. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      H E Grossniklaus, J H Oakman, C Cohen, F P Calhoun, P B DeRose, C Drews-Botsch; Histopathology, morphometry, and nuclear DNA content of iris melanocytic lesions.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1995;36(3):745-750.

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To compare the histologic, morphometric and nuclear DNA content of a group of benign and malignant melanocytic lesions of the iris. METHODS: Forty-four surgically excised melanocytic lesions of the iris were histologically classified as nevus or melanoma. Morphometric analysis using a digital filar micrometer (LaSICO 1602N-10 and 5-4A) measured the mean size of the 10 largest nucleoli, and Feulgen staining and image cytometry (CAS 200 Cell Analysis Systems) analyzed the nuclear DNA ploidy in the lesions. Patient follow-up information was obtained whenever possible. RESULTS: Sixteen cases were histologically classified as nevi and twenty-eight cases as melanoma. The mean of the 10 largest nucleoli of the nevi was smaller than the mean among the melanomas (1.772 microns [SD = 0.366] and 2.773 microns [SD = 0.565], respectively). Feulgen staining revealed that all lesions were diploid, with the exception of two hyperdiploid and two hypodiploid melanomas. Of the patients with follow-up information available, none with nevi developed a metastasis and two with melanoma died of metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: The histologic classification of iris melanocytic lesions (i.e., nevus versus melanoma) correlates to nucleolar size (P < 0.001) but not to nuclear DNA ploidy.

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