August 1995
Volume 36, Issue 9
Free
Articles  |   August 1995
Effects of adenosine on ocular blood flow.
Author Affiliations
  • M Portellos
    Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA.
  • C E Riva
    Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA.
  • S D Cranstoun
    Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA.
  • B L Petrig
    Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA.
  • A J Brucker
    Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science August 1995, Vol.36, 1904-1909. doi:
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      M Portellos, C E Riva, S D Cranstoun, B L Petrig, A J Brucker; Effects of adenosine on ocular blood flow.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1995;36(9):1904-1909.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the effect of intravascular adenosine on blood flow in the ocular fundus and to examine indirectly whether the blood-brain barrier to adenosine, which exists in the cerebrovasculature of the cat, is present in the eye of this animal. METHODS: The noninvasive techniques of laser Doppler flowmetry and velocimetry along with fundus photography were used to measure the change in optic nerve head and choroidal and retinal blood flow during intravenous infusions of 0.18 and 0.6 mg/kg per minute of adenosine. RESULTS: Infusions of adenosine induced significant increases in choroidal blood flow (60% with 0.6 mg/kg per minute) but not in optic nerve head or retinal blood flows. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of effect of intravenously infused adenosine on the optic nerve and retinal circulations is most likely caused by the tight junctions in the vessels of these vascular beds, which prevent adenosine from reaching its receptors. Perivascular adenosine in the choroid most likely accounts for the increase in blood flow in this tissue.

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