February 1997
Volume 38, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   February 1997
Adoptive transfer of murine cytomegalovirus-immune lymph node cells prevents retinitis in T-cell-depleted mice.
Author Affiliations
  • Y Lu
    Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio 78284, USA.
  • J E Bigger
    Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio 78284, USA.
  • C A Thomas
    Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio 78284, USA.
  • S S Atherton
    Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio 78284, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1997, Vol.38, 301-310. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Y Lu, J E Bigger, C A Thomas, S S Atherton; Adoptive transfer of murine cytomegalovirus-immune lymph node cells prevents retinitis in T-cell-depleted mice.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1997;38(2):301-310.

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Abstract

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether adoptive transfer of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-immune lymph node cells prevents retinitis in immunosuppressed mice. METHODS: Adult BALB/c mice were thymectomized and T-cell depleted using rat monoclonal antibodies specific for mouse CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. The level of rat immunoglobulin G in the treated mice was monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immune cells were labeled with PKH26-GH immediately before adoptive transfer, and flow cytometry was used to determine the percentage of adoptively transferred T-cells (PKH+, fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC+]) in the spleens of the recipient mice 3 days after transfer. The ability of adoptively transferred cells to protect from retinitis was studied in T-cell-depleted mice injected with MCMV through the supraciliary route. Mice received 4 x 10(7) in vitro-restimulated MCMV-immune cells, 4 x 10(7) freshly isolated MCMV-immune cells, 4 x 10(7) freshly isolated ovalbumin-immune cells, or no cells (control group). RESULTS: The best time to balance depletion of endogenous T-cells with persistence of transferred cells was 3 weeks after T-cell depletion. Both restimulated and freshly isolated MCMV-immune cells conferred protection from retinitis. Freshly isolated ovalbumin-immune lymph node cells did not prevent retinitis, indicating that protection was virus-specific and merely was not because of transfer of antigen-activated lymph node cells. CONCLUSIONS: Adoptive immunotherapy has been used to prevent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in patients who have undergone transplantation, and, by extrapolation, the results of these studies suggest that adoptive immunotherapy with human CMV-specific immune cells might be used to prevent or ameliorate CMV retinitis in immunocompromised patients.

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