November 1997
Volume 38, Issue 12
Free
Articles  |   November 1997
Demographic characteristics of the vision-disabled elderly.
Author Affiliations
  • D B Elliott
    Department of Optometry, University of Bradford, United Kingdom.
  • M Trukolo-Ilic
    Department of Optometry, University of Bradford, United Kingdom.
  • J G Strong
    Department of Optometry, University of Bradford, United Kingdom.
  • R Pace
    Department of Optometry, University of Bradford, United Kingdom.
  • A Plotkin
    Department of Optometry, University of Bradford, United Kingdom.
  • P Bevers
    Department of Optometry, University of Bradford, United Kingdom.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science November 1997, Vol.38, 2566-2575. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      D B Elliott, M Trukolo-Ilic, J G Strong, R Pace, A Plotkin, P Bevers; Demographic characteristics of the vision-disabled elderly.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1997;38(12):2566-2575.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

PURPOSE: To profile certain demographic features of the low-vision population in Ontario, Canada. METHODS: Sixty-six optometrists or optometry centers, 8 ophthalmologists, and 23 Canadian National Institute for the Blind rehabilitation worker teams were recruited to the study. They were required to report on their low-vision examinations during a 3-year period. RESULTS: Reports from 4744 low-vision examinations were received. Of the patients examined, 71% were over age 65 (subsequently called seniors or elderly), and 55% were over age 75. Ninety percent of all the patients lived in households and 10% lived in institutions. Seniors made up 71% of the patients living in households and 88% of the patients living in institutions. Most of the seniors were women (65%), and 57% had functional limitations in addition to low vision, most commonly limitations in mobility, hearing, or agility. Age-related maculopathy was the primary diagnosis in 75% of seniors, and the most common secondary diagnosis was cataract (46%). The main objective for most elderly low-vision patients was to gain improvement in personal reading (75%). CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority of low-vision patients were elderly, the largest number being 75 to 84 years old. When older senior low-vision patients (> or = 85 years) were compared with younger seniors (65 to 74 years), the older seniors were more likely to be women, more likely to have additional functional limitations, more likely to live in an institution, and more likely to have age-related maculopathy and cataract. Whether some elderly low-vision patients may be helped by cataract surgery needs to be determined.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×