February 1997
Volume 38, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   February 1997
Investigations on subjective and objective cyclorotatory changes after inferior oblique muscle recession.
Author Affiliations
  • H D Schworm
    Eye Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
  • S Eithoff
    Eye Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
  • M Schaumberger
    Eye Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
  • K P Boergen
    Eye Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1997, Vol.38, 405-412. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      H D Schworm, S Eithoff, M Schaumberger, K P Boergen; Investigations on subjective and objective cyclorotatory changes after inferior oblique muscle recession.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1997;38(2):405-412.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine subjective and objective cyclorotatory changes after surgery for oblique muscle disorders and to analyze the mechanisms of the well-known, long-term, postoperative, subjective cyclotorsional changes. METHODS: Twenty-six patients underwent unilateral inferior oblique muscle recession for strabismus sursoadductorius (inferior oblique overfunction). Subjective and objective cyclodeviation were examined before surgery with and without diagnostic occlusion, as well as 1 day, 3 days, and 4 months after surgery. Subjective cyclodeviation was assessed by Harms' tangent scale. Objective cycloposition was measured by means of fundus cyclometry, a novel method using an infrared scanning laser ophthalmoscope. RESULTS: Diagnostic occlusion did not lead to significant changes in either objective or subjective cyclodeviation. Preoperative objective excycloposition was nearly equally distributed between affected eyes and fellow eyes. Early surgically induced incyclorotatory effects were more pronounced objectively than subjectively. On long-term follow-up, a reduction in the incyclorotatory effect was found to be smaller subjectively than objectively. A significant difference between subjective and objective cycloposition was seen early after surgery, and a significant difference between subjective and objective cyclorotatory change was found immediately after surgery and on long-term follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term regression of the incyclorotatory effect after inferior oblique muscle recession was confirmed objectively and subjectively and can be explained as a cessation of preoperatively required binocular compensatory innervation. The authors conclude that the difference between objective and subjective regression is caused by sensory cyclofusion.

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