July 1997
Volume 38, Issue 8
Free
Articles  |   July 1997
Measurement of ultraviolet radiation at the surface of the eye.
Author Affiliations
  • M M Sydenham
    Center for Eye Research, School of Optometry, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
  • M J Collins
    Center for Eye Research, School of Optometry, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
  • L W Hirst
    Center for Eye Research, School of Optometry, Queensland University of Technology, Australia.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1997, Vol.38, 1485-1492. doi:
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      M M Sydenham, M J Collins, L W Hirst; Measurement of ultraviolet radiation at the surface of the eye.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1997;38(8):1485-1492.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: A new method for the measurement of ultraviolet radiation that reaches the surface of the eye is described. METHODS: The technique uses contact lenses produced from the ultraviolet-sensitive plastic polysulfone. Two types of polysulfone contact lenses (9 mm and 12 mm in diameter) were manufactured from a polysulfone rod. The 9-mm polysulfone contact lens could be calibrated and used to determine the ocular-to-ambient exposure ratio in a fashion similar to polysulfone film badges. The 12-mm polysulfone contact lens was designed as a "piggy-back" lens and required a larger diameter polymethlylmethacrylate carrier lens to fit the eye adequately. A method of in vivo stabilization was developed to minimize lens rotation. RESULTS: During four wearing trials, the ratio of ocular-to-ambient ultraviolet exposure ranged from 4% to 23%. CONCLUSIONS: Contact lenses manufactured from polysulfone offer the potential to study the exposure of the eye to ultraviolet radiation. The smaller diameter lens can measure an average ocular exposure, whereas the larger, stabilized, piggy-back design may allow regional dose assessment across the entire lens surface.

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