July 1997
Volume 38, Issue 8
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Articles  |   July 1997
Immunocytochemical study of dystrophin localization in cone cells of mouse retinas.
Author Affiliations
  • H Ueda
    Department of Anatomy, Yamanashi Medical University, Tamaho, Japan.
  • Y Kato
    Department of Anatomy, Yamanashi Medical University, Tamaho, Japan.
  • T Baba
    Department of Anatomy, Yamanashi Medical University, Tamaho, Japan.
  • N Terada
    Department of Anatomy, Yamanashi Medical University, Tamaho, Japan.
  • Y Fujii
    Department of Anatomy, Yamanashi Medical University, Tamaho, Japan.
  • S Tsukahara
    Department of Anatomy, Yamanashi Medical University, Tamaho, Japan.
  • S Ohno
    Department of Anatomy, Yamanashi Medical University, Tamaho, Japan.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 1997, Vol.38, 1627-1630. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      H Ueda, Y Kato, T Baba, N Terada, Y Fujii, S Tsukahara, S Ohno; Immunocytochemical study of dystrophin localization in cone cells of mouse retinas.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1997;38(8):1627-1630.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: Previously, the authors reported that dystrophin was observed under the rod cell membranes in rat retinas. However, it was not determined whether dystrophin is located in cone cells. In the current study, the authors clarify dystrophin localization in cone cells of mouse retinas. METHODS: Immunoblotting, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy were used to investigate retinal dystrophin with a monoclonal antibody raised against the human dystrophin C-terminus. RESULTS: Immunoblotting analysis showed some immunoreactive bands from retinal extracts. Confocal images indicated two different immunostaining patterns: One was a tiny dot, and the other was a larger, aggregated dot. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that retinal dystrophin was localized in cone cells as well as in rod cells. CONCLUSIONS: Retinal dystrophin is a common component of cone and rod cells and probably is related to the physiological function of photoreceptor cells.

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