January 1998
Volume 39, Issue 1
Free
Articles  |   January 1998
Optical and structural development of the crystalline lens in childhood.
Author Affiliations
  • D O Mutti
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
  • K Zadnik
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
  • R E Fusaro
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
  • N E Friedman
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
  • R I Sholtz
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
  • A J Adams
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley 94720-2020, USA.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1998, Vol.39, 120-133. doi:https://doi.org/
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      D O Mutti, K Zadnik, R E Fusaro, N E Friedman, R I Sholtz, A J Adams; Optical and structural development of the crystalline lens in childhood.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1998;39(1):120-133. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To document the development of key optical and structural parameters of the crystalline lens throughout childhood and examine possible mechanisms by which lens power remains coordinated with the growth of the eye to maintain emmetropia. METHODS: Using cycloplegic autorefraction, video-based phakometry, and ultrasonography, the authors measured refractive error and crystalline lens parameters in 994 children in the first through eighth grades, who participated in the Orinda Longitudinal Study of Myopia, between one and five times from 1989 through 1993. Polynomial growth curves were fit to the data by maximum likelihood estimation. The average annual rates of change in each parameter from each subject's longitudinal data were also estimated. RESULTS: The lens radii of curvature flattened throughout childhood, yet decreases in lens equivalent power stopped after 10 years of age. This indicates that the refractive index of the lens increased during later childhood. Lens thinning in early childhood also ceased after 10 years of age. The spherical volume of the lens showed no appreciable net increase, but the axial length of the eye continued to grow throughout childhood. The prevalence of myopia in our data increased sharply at age 10 years, reaching 21.3% by the age of 14 years. CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent thinning and flattening of the crystalline lens imply that the lens is mechanically stretched by the equatorial growth of the eye during childhood. Changes in the patterns of lens development near the age of 10 years, concurrent with the onset of myopia, suggest that forces arise which interfere with equatorial growth. Such forces might diminish the decreases in lens power and amplify axial elongation to promote myopia.

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