November 1970
Volume 9, Issue 11
Free
Articles  |   November 1970
Effect of Sympathetic Stimulation on Critical Closure of Intraocular Blood Vessels
Author Affiliations
  • MILTON BEST
    Departments of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Bird S. Coler Hospital Division, Center for Chronic Disease, Welfare Island, New York, N. Y. Hadassah Medical School Jerusalem, Israel
  • MICHAEL BLUMENTHAL
    Departments of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Bird S. Coler Hospital Division, Center for Chronic Disease, Welfare Island, New York, N. Y. Hadassah Medical School Jerusalem, Israel
  • SAMUEL MASKET
    Departments of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Bird S. Coler Hospital Division, Center for Chronic Disease, Welfare Island, New York, N. Y. Hadassah Medical School Jerusalem, Israel
  • MILES A. GALIN
    Departments of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Bird S. Coler Hospital Division, Center for Chronic Disease, Welfare Island, New York, N. Y. Hadassah Medical School Jerusalem, Israel
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science November 1970, Vol.9, 911-916. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      MILTON BEST, MICHAEL BLUMENTHAL, SAMUEL MASKET, MILES A. GALIN; Effect of Sympathetic Stimulation on Critical Closure of Intraocular Blood Vessels. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1970;9(11):911-916.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Acute common carotid occlusion in rabbits causes a reduction in ocular blood volume and ciliary artery blood pressure. At all levels of intraocular pressure, cervical sympathetic stimulation reduces these changes. The ocular blood volume reduction after acute common carotid occlusion is not linearly related to the absolute blood pressure change or to the lowest blood pressure reached in the ciliary artery; it is related to the effective perfusion pressure after occlusion. Effective perfusion pressure is equal to ciliary artery blood pressure minus intraocular pressure and it reflects the transmural pressure of ocular blood vessels. The effective perfusion pressure at which the peak ocular volume change occurs after acute common carotid occlusion reflects the critical closing pressure of the ocular blood vessels. This approaches zero in the absence of sympathetic stimulation and is 10 mm. Hg or greater in the presence of sympathetic stimulation.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×