October 1968
Volume 7, Issue 5
Free
Articles  |   October 1968
Lens Epithelium Proliferation in Sugar Cataracts
Author Affiliations
  • PATRICIA GRIMES
    Ophthalmology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare Bethesda, Md. 20014.
  • LUDWIG VON SALLMANN
    Ophthalmology Branch, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Blindness, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare Bethesda, Md. 20014.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science October 1968, Vol.7, 535-543. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      PATRICIA GRIMES, LUDWIG VON SALLMANN; Lens Epithelium Proliferation in Sugar Cataracts. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1968;7(5):535-543.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Alloxan-diabetic rats demonstrated a striking transient stimulation of cell division in the lens epithelium which was identical in time course to that occurring in galactose-fed rats, although of less magnitude. Under both experimental conditions, the wave of increased mitotic activity was rapid in onset, reached a peak at 4 days, and subsided by 7 days. No signs of cell death or morphological abnormalities accompanied the rise in rate of cell proliferation. Xylose-feeding induced no change in the mitotic activity of this cell population. In the case of galactose, the burst of mitoses coincided with the appearance of typical equatorial opacities and a marked increase in lens volume. Swelling was detected as early as 12 hours and reached a maximum at 4 days. Alloxan diabetic lenses, however, showed, no increase in volume during the period of mitotic stimulation and biomicroscopically visible opacities did not develop until after the wave of proliferative activity had subsided. Additional rat lenses were maintained in vitro so that the galactose-induced osmotic swelling could be controlled by appropriate variation in the tonicity of the medium. A toxic effect of galactose in vitro characterized by mitotic inhibition and severe damage of the epithelial cells prevented the appearance of the proliferative response and the possibility of testing the relation of this response to lens sivelling.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×