June 1965
Volume 4, Issue 3
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Articles  |   June 1965
An Autoradiographic Study of the Penetration of Subconjunctivally Injected Hydrocortisone into the Normal and Inflamed Rabbit Eye
Author Affiliations
  • H. J. MCCARTNEY
    Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  • I. O. DRYSDALE
    Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
  • A. G. GORNALL
    Department of Pathological Chemistry, University of Toronto
  • P. K. BASU
    Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 1965, Vol.4, 297-302. doi:
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      H. J. MCCARTNEY, I. O. DRYSDALE, A. G. GORNALL, P. K. BASU; An Autoradiographic Study of the Penetration of Subconjunctivally Injected Hydrocortisone into the Normal and Inflamed Rabbit Eye. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1965;4(3):297-302.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to visualize the actual route of penetration of subconjunctivally injected hydrocortisone into the rabbit eye, and also to determine if lid movement or intraocular inflammation influenced this penetration. Albino rabbits, each with one eye inflamed by an intravitreal injection of 30 per cent bovine albumin and the other eye normal, were treated with subconjunctivally injected hydrocortisone to each eye in the superior temporal quadrant. Half of the animals were then anesthetized to prevent normal lid movement, and the remainder received no anesthesia, thus maintaining normal lid movement. The eyes of all the animals were then studied at specific time intervals with a dry-freezing technique and two different methods of autoradiography. This study indicated that subconjunctival hydrocortisone penetrates directly into the eye. Penetration was increased in the presence of inflammation but was unchanged as a result of lid movement. On the basis of these observations it would appear that subconjunctival injections of hydrocortisone, to produce the maximum effect with the minimum dosage, should be immediately adjacent to the intraocular inflammation under treatment, rather than placing the injection haphazardly or always in the superior temporal quadrant, which is often the case.

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