April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Parallel scanning laser ophthalmoscope (PSLO) for high-speed retinal imaging
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kari V Vienola
    Rotterdam Ophthalmic Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Boy Braaf
    Rotterdam Ophthalmic Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Mathivanan Damodaran
    Rotterdam Ophthalmic Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Koenraad Arndt Vermeer
    Rotterdam Ophthalmic Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Johannes F de Boer
    Rotterdam Ophthalmic Institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands
    LaserLAB, Department of Physics and Astronomy, VU University, Amsterdam, Netherlands
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Kari Vienola, None; Boy Braaf, None; Mathivanan Damodaran, None; Koenraad Vermeer, None; Johannes de Boer, Massachusetts General Hospital (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 1603. doi:
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      Kari V Vienola, Boy Braaf, Mathivanan Damodaran, Koenraad Arndt Vermeer, Johannes F de Boer; Parallel scanning laser ophthalmoscope (PSLO) for high-speed retinal imaging. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):1603.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

High-speed imaging of the retina is crucial for obtaining high quality images in the presence of eye motion. To improve the speed of traditional scanners, a high-speed ophthalmic device is presented using a digital micro-mirror device (DMD) for confocal imaging with multiple simultaneous spots.

 
Methods
 

The PSLO consists of three parts: an illumination, an imaging and a detector arm (Fig. 1). The DMD is uniformly illuminated with a near-infrared (850 nm) LED. The separation between ON positioned mirror elements was made large enough to eliminate cross-talk between neighboring virtual pinholes, and therefore allowed multi-spot confocal imaging across the whole field of view (FOV). The DMD is programmed to project series of shifted point pattern configurations, effectively scanning the spots over the sample surface. The DMD was imaged onto a sample and the returning light was tapped of via a beam-splitter and imaged on a CMOS camera. Multiple point illuminated frames are combined to form one confocal wide-field image. As a proof of principle images of a resolution target were acquired with the PSLO system.

 
Results
 

The resolution target was imaged with a pattern with virtual pinhole size of 2x2 mirrors and the separation between two pinholes was 4 mirror elements. Figure 1B shows the results for combining 9 illumination patterns to form the final image.

 
Conclusions
 

It is possible to create wide-field confocal images with the PSLO system. In theory the DMD can achieve higher frame rates than traditional scanner-based systems by illuminating the sample with multiple spots. In retinal imaging, such a setup will provide better images because higher imaging speeds reduce motion artifacts.

 
 
A schematic of the optical layout. The red color indicates the illumination and blue is for back-reflected light. The resolution target was placed on the image plane indicated by a dashed line. (A) Point-sources are scanned over the FOV. (B) The resulting image is combined from 9 different point illumination patterns.
 
A schematic of the optical layout. The red color indicates the illumination and blue is for back-reflected light. The resolution target was placed on the image plane indicated by a dashed line. (A) Point-sources are scanned over the FOV. (B) The resulting image is combined from 9 different point illumination patterns.
 
Keywords: 551 imaging/image analysis: non-clinical • 596 microscopy: confocal/tunneling • 688 retina  
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