April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Biocompatibility of Biochemically Modified Surfaces as a Fixation Concept for Epiretinal Stimulator Arrays
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gernot Roessler
    Dept of Ophthalmology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • Wilfried Mokwa
    Dept of Materials in Electrical Engineering, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • Bernd Sellhaus
    Dept of Neuropathology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • Babac Mazinani
    Dept of Ophthalmology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • Peter Walter
    Dept of Ophthalmology, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Gernot Roessler, None; Wilfried Mokwa, None; Bernd Sellhaus, None; Babac Mazinani, None; Peter Walter, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 1833. doi:
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      Gernot Roessler, Wilfried Mokwa, Bernd Sellhaus, Babac Mazinani, Peter Walter; Biocompatibility of Biochemically Modified Surfaces as a Fixation Concept for Epiretinal Stimulator Arrays. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):1833.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To prove the biocompatibility of biochemical fixation procedures for epiretinal stimulators as an alternative to the conventional fixation using retinal tacks

Methods: Polyimide microstructures were coated with different protein configurations by immobilizing laminin peptide composites onto the surface. Implantation was performed in rabbits including vitrectomy and the positioning of the structures onto the retinal surface. Following an observation period of three months the eyes were enucleated for histopathological examination.

Results: Clinical examination during observation period show tight contact of the devices. Following enucleation HE staining revealed minor alteration of retinal tissue, showing a moderate degree of cystic disaggregation but with with good preservation of retinal cell layers’ integrity. In immunhistochemistry, slightly increased staining of Mueller cells suggests mild glial cell activation, while inflammatory cells are absent as in normal retina.

Conclusions: We demonstrated that basically a tight contact of the modified microstructures with the retinal surface could be achieved. The surgical interventions for implantation and explantation as well as the visual prosthesis itself do not produce any significant inflammatory effects in the retinal tissues. The findings suggest for the device to be sufficiently safe from a histopathologic point of view as to be further examined clinically.

Keywords: 696 retinal degenerations: hereditary • 699 retinal glia • 637 pathology: experimental  
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