April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Non-Invasive Detection for Parkinson’s Disease with Quantification of Minute and Subtle Eyelid Movements
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kazutaka Suzuki
    Central Research Laboratory, HAMAMATSU PHOTONICS K.K., Hamamatsu, Japan
  • Haruyoshi Toyoda
    Central Research Laboratory, HAMAMATSU PHOTONICS K.K., Hamamatsu, Japan
  • Naotoshi Hakamata
    Central Research Laboratory, HAMAMATSU PHOTONICS K.K., Hamamatsu, Japan
  • Naoko Kimura
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
  • Akihide Watanabe
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
  • Shigeru Kinoshita
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Kazutaka Suzuki, HAMAMATSU PHOTONICS K.K. (E); Haruyoshi Toyoda, HAMAMATSU PHOTONICS K.K. (E); Naotoshi Hakamata, HAMAMATSU PHOTONICS K.K. (E); Naoko Kimura, None; Akihide Watanabe, None; Shigeru Kinoshita, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 2566. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Kazutaka Suzuki, Haruyoshi Toyoda, Naotoshi Hakamata, Naoko Kimura, Akihide Watanabe, Shigeru Kinoshita; Non-Invasive Detection for Parkinson’s Disease with Quantification of Minute and Subtle Eyelid Movements. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):2566.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To develop a non-invasive diagnostic method for Parkinson's Disease (PD) using quantification of minute and subtle eyelid movements.

 
Methods
 

This study involves 20 PD patients and 25 age-matched healthy controls.Spontaneous blinking was recorded for 40 seconds.During the recording these subjects were guided to gaze in the straight-forward direction at a green fixation point.Figure 1 shows our blink measuring system built with the Intelligent Vision Sensor (IVS, HAMAMATSU PHOTONICS K.K.) which can take 1000 images per second and process the acquired images in real time.We extracted eyelid blink motion or speed exceeding 5mm/sec defined it as period of eyelid motion and then analyzed the times of blinks and amplitude.

 
Results
 

The points at the center of a Figure 2 are the amplitude of the blink for each subject went.The left-hand side points express the healthy control's amplitude, and the right-hand side points express the PD patient's amplitude.The histogram on either side of Figure 2 shows the number of times for each amplitude range of the blink.Amplitude of blinks of PD patients took shorter than healthy controls (average 4.1, SD 2.4 mm vs. average 6.6, SD 2.5 mm : p<0.0001).In terms of number of occurrences of the blink, there was no significant difference between healthy controls (average 14.6, SD 9.3 times) and PD patients (average 12.7, SD 9.4 times).But, in PD patients, we could see that there are many short blinks which did not reach the lower eyelid completely during the blink motion.

 
Conclusions
 

Previous studies have shown that the blink amplitude was shortened and the blink rate was usually decreased in PD patients, although in some patients the blink rate was increased.As a result of evaluating the blink with high-speed and high-precision, we found suggestions that there was no change in the frequency of the blink in PD patients, although amplitude of the blink was shortened as with previous research.We think that the reason of this new suggestion is that the short blink wave, which is too short for measuring, could be measured by our measurement system.We expect that the quantification of fast and small blinks becomes possible by using this technique, and we can have early detection of PD and perform suitable medical treatment at an early stage.

 
 
Setup for Characterizing Eyelid Motion
 
Setup for Characterizing Eyelid Motion
 
 
Characterization of Eyelid Motion for PD Patients and Healthy Controls
 
Characterization of Eyelid Motion for PD Patients and Healthy Controls
 
Keywords: 526 eyelid • 612 neuro-ophthalmology: diagnosis • 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical  
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