April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Psychosocial Benefits of Strabismus Surgery in Adult Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brianna Volk
    Research, University of Iowa, Waukee, IA
  • Donny W Suh
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Nebraska, West Des Moines, IA
    Pediatric Ophthalmology, Wolfe Eye Clinic, West Des Moines, IA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Brianna Volk, None; Donny Suh, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 2601. doi:
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      Brianna Volk, Donny W Suh; Psychosocial Benefits of Strabismus Surgery in Adult Patients. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):2601.

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To show psychosocial benefits of strabismus surgery as reported from postoperative patient perspectives in a community based adult strabismus clinic population.

 
Methods
 

Fifty-eight adult patients were interviewed postoperatively and asked to identify the most significant changes, positive or negative, following their surgeries. A Patient Surgery Satisfaction score (PSS) was then assigned based on a predetermined scoring scale, ranging from +3 to -3 where positive numbers corresponded to positive impacts on the patient’s day-to-day life and negative numbers to negative impacts.

 
Results
 

Of the 58 participating patients, 51 (87.9%) patients indicated positive PSS scores; 4 (6.9%) patients indicated negative PSS scores; and 3 (5.2%) patients indicated PSS scores of zero. A collective mean PSS score of 2.03 indicated that strabismus surgery had a moderately positive impact on the patient population (P < 0.05). Preoperative concerns voluntarily expressed by patients included: double vision, poor depth perception, self-consciousness, poor peripheral vision, difficulty reading, tilting/turning of the head, blurry vision, and eye misalignment. Of these, the primary concerns were double vision, self-consciousness, and eye misalignment, each of which were mentioned by at least 28 (48.3%) patients. Comparing the pre- and postoperative patient concerns, all categories showed a decrease. The most drastic decreases occurred in patients’ concerns about self-consciousness and eye misalignment. Preoperatively 39 (67.2%) patients mentioned being self-conscious while postoperatively 3 (5.1%) patients remained concerned with self-consciousness. Similarly, preoperatively 36 (62.1%) patients expressed concern with their eye misalignments while postoperatively eye misalignment was a concern addressed by 3 (5.1%) patients.

 
Conclusions
 

Strabismus surgery benefits adult patients in many aspects including: double vision, depth perception, self-consciousness, peripheral vision, reading, head tilting, blurry vision, and eye misalignment. There is a significant psychosocial benefit in strabismus surgery.

 
 
Figure 1: Comparison of Patient Surgery Satisfaction Scores (PSS) relative to the number of patients and patients' surgery descriptions.
 
Figure 1: Comparison of Patient Surgery Satisfaction Scores (PSS) relative to the number of patients and patients' surgery descriptions.
 
 
Figure 2: Comparison of the primary patient concerns voluntarily expressed before and after strabismus surgery.
 
Figure 2: Comparison of the primary patient concerns voluntarily expressed before and after strabismus surgery.
 
Keywords: 722 strabismus • 725 strabismus: treatment  
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