April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Conjunctival microbial flora in Stevens-Johnson syndrome ocular sequelae patients at a tertiary eye care centre in India
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Renu Venugopal
    Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Sushil Sangwan
    Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Gita Satpathy
    Ocular Microbiology, Dr. R. P. Centre for Ophthalmic Sciences, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Tushar Agarwal
    Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Namrata Sharma
    Ophthalmology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Renu Venugopal, None; Sushil Sangwan, None; Gita Satpathy, None; Tushar Agarwal, None; Namrata Sharma, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 2772. doi:
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      Renu Venugopal, Sushil Sangwan, Gita Satpathy, Tushar Agarwal, Namrata Sharma, NO; Conjunctival microbial flora in Stevens-Johnson syndrome ocular sequelae patients at a tertiary eye care centre in India. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):2772.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate and compare the conjunctival microbial flora in Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) patient eyes with normal eyes.

Methods: The study comprised of 176 Stevens- Johnson syndrome (SJS) eyes from 88 SJS patients from the outpatient department. 73 normal eyes (preoperative cataract patients without any topical antibiotic administration) were also enrolled as controls. Conjunctival swabs were collected from inferior fornix using sterile cotton-tipped swabs and cultured for bacterial isolation and antibiotic resistance testing.

Results: Out of the 176 eyes studied, 104 eyes had positive cultures (59%). In the control group, a total of 9 out of 73 eyes had positive cultures (12.08%). In the SJS group, a total of 14 different types of isolates were identified of which coagulase-negative Staphylococci was found in 30 eyes (17%), Staphylococcus aureus in 19 (10.7%) and Corynebacteriae in 35 (19.8%) eyes. Multiple microorganisms were found in 7 eyes (6.7%). In the control group, the isolates identified were coagulase-negative Staphylococci in 7 eyes and Streptococcus pneumonia in 2 eyes. Analysis of microbial flora between the two groups showed significantly higher rate of positivity in SJS group (46%) as compared to control group (P=0.001, 95% CI:0.36,0.59). More than 16% of the isolates indentified in the SJS group showed resistance to flouroquinolones in the antibiotic resistance test.

Conclusions: Conjunctival microbial flora is varies widely in SJS eyes. Microbial colonization of ocular surface with pathogenic organism may predispose these eyes for infection.

Keywords: 474 conjunctiva • 486 cornea: tears/tear film/dry eye • 593 microbial pathogenesis: clinical studies  
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