April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Dexamethasone Intravitreal Implant in the Treatment of Persistent Uveitic Macular Edema in the Absence of Active Inflammation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Cao
    Ophthalmology, University of Colorado, Denver, CO
  • Matthew L Mulvahill
    School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO
  • Li Zhang
    School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO
  • Brian C Joondeph
    Colorado Retina Associates, Denver, CO
  • Mark S Dacey
    Colorado Retina Associates, Denver, CO
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jennifer Cao, None; Matthew Mulvahill, None; Li Zhang, None; Brian Joondeph, None; Mark Dacey, Allergan (R)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 2852. doi:
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      Jennifer Cao, Matthew L Mulvahill, Li Zhang, Brian C Joondeph, Mark S Dacey; Dexamethasone Intravitreal Implant in the Treatment of Persistent Uveitic Macular Edema in the Absence of Active Inflammation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):2852.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To examine the observational effectiveness of the dexamethasone (DEX) intravitreal implant (Ozurdex®; Allergan, Inc, Irvine, CA, USA) in the treatment of non-infectious uveitic macular edema in patients with otherwise quiescent uveitis.

Methods: This is a retrospective chart review of twenty seven consecutive patients (33 eyes) with persistent macular edema resistant to standard short-term therapy despite quiescent non-infectious intermediate and posterior uveitis. Each patient was treated with a DEX 0.7 mg implant. Primary outcome measure was resolution of macular edema as measured by decrease in central macular thickness. Secondary outcome was change in visual acuity at 1, 2, and 3 months post-injection.

Results: Twenty seven eyes of twenty seven patients were included for analysis (one eye was randomly selected for six of these patients receiving bilateral DEX implants). There was a statistically significant reduction in mean central macular thickness at 1 month post-DEX implantation (mean 278.9um, range 206-352) compared to baseline (mean 478.7 um, range 330-667um) (p<0.0001). There was a statistically significant improvement in visual acuity at 3 months (LogMAR 0.42; 20/50-1) compared to baseline (LogMAR 0.61; 20/80+) (p=0.0007). There were no major complications following DEX implantation.

Conclusions: The DEX implant resulted in a statistically significant improvement in mean central macular thickness and visual acuity without any serious adverse events. Our study suggests that the DEX implant may be a useful treatment modality in the successful management of uveitic CME, even in the absence of active inflammation, and may be an effective agent that may allow patients to delay more invasive treatment such as pars plana vitrectomy.

Keywords: 585 macula/fovea • 746 uveitis-clinical/animal model • 466 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: treatment/prevention assessment/controlled clinical trials  
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