April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Morphology and Vascular Layers of the Choroid in Stargardt’s Disease Analyzed Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah Read
    New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miami, FL
  • Mehreen Adhi
    New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • Daniela Ferrara
    New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • Jay S Duker
    New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • Nadia K Waheed
    New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Sarah Read, None; Mehreen Adhi, None; Daniela Ferrara, None; Jay Duker, Carl Zeiss Meditech, Inc. (F), Optovue, Inc. (F); Nadia Waheed, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 3349. doi:
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      Sarah Read, Mehreen Adhi, Daniela Ferrara, Jay S Duker, Nadia K Waheed, New England Eye Center, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Morphology and Vascular Layers of the Choroid in Stargardt’s Disease Analyzed Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):3349.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Stargardt’s disease (STGD) is the most common inherited retinal disease. Choroidal angiopathy may be involved in the pathogenesis of Stargardt’s disease. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) is increasingly being used to analyze the choroid in healthy and diseased eyes. This study aimed to examine the total thickness, morphology and individual vascular layers of the choroid in eyes with Stargardt’s disease using SD-OCT.

 
Methods
 

A retrospective review identified patients with STGD and healthy subjects who underwent 1-line raster scanning using a Cirrus SD-OCT between November 2009 and September 2012.

 
Results
 

The choroid in eyes with STGD showed a number of morphological characteristics that differed from healthy controls, including an irregular shape in 26 of 41 (64%) eyes with STGD compared to 0 of 30 (0.0%) healthy eyes (Figure 1). Mean sub-foveal total choroidal thickness and mean sub-foveal large choroidal vessel layer thickness were significantly reduced in eyes with STGD (p=0.03 and p=0.04 respectively, Figure 2a). The maximal choroidal thickness was sub-foveal in only 9 of 41 (22%) eyes and focal choroidal thinning was observed in 21 of 41 (51%) of eyes with STGD. An attenuation of the large choroidal vessel layer was observed in 8 of 41 (20%) eyes with STGD and these eyes had significantly worse visual acuity (p=0.007, Figure 2b).

 
Conclusions
 

This study shows that alterations in the total thickness, morphology and the individual vascular layers of the choroid are visible on SD-OCT in eyes with STGD. It also suggests that an enhanced attenuation of the large choroidal vessel layer may have an effect on visual function in eyes with STGD. These findings may potentially contribute to staging and monitoring of STGD.

 
 
Figure 1. (A) Representative OCT image of a healthy eye showing a pattern of thinnest choroid nasally, thickest beneath the fovea (green box) and thinning out again temporally. Red line represents the convex contour to the choroido-scleral interface. (B) Representative OCT image of an eye with Stargardt’s disease showing an irregular or “S” shape” to the choroido-scleral interface (red line). The thickest point of the choroid is not sub-foveal (green box).
 
Figure 1. (A) Representative OCT image of a healthy eye showing a pattern of thinnest choroid nasally, thickest beneath the fovea (green box) and thinning out again temporally. Red line represents the convex contour to the choroido-scleral interface. (B) Representative OCT image of an eye with Stargardt’s disease showing an irregular or “S” shape” to the choroido-scleral interface (red line). The thickest point of the choroid is not sub-foveal (green box).
 
 
Figure 2. (A) Mean sub-foveal choroidal thickness. (B) Mean difference in LogMAR visual acuity.
 
Figure 2. (A) Mean sub-foveal choroidal thickness. (B) Mean difference in LogMAR visual acuity.
 
Keywords: 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical • 696 retinal degenerations: hereditary • 452 choroid  
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