April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
The Prevalence of Uncorrected Refractive Error and Unmet Refractive Need in Chinese Americans: The Chinese American Eye Study (CHES)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlotte E Joslin
    Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
    Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Chunyi Hsu
    Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Shaung Wu
    Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Xuejuan Jiang
    Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Mina Torres
    Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Rohit Varma
    Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary, Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Charlotte Joslin, None; Chunyi Hsu, None; Shaung Wu, None; Xuejuan Jiang, None; Mina Torres, None; Rohit Varma, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 3633. doi:
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      Charlotte E Joslin, Chunyi Hsu, Shaung Wu, Xuejuan Jiang, Mina Torres, Rohit Varma, ; The Prevalence of Uncorrected Refractive Error and Unmet Refractive Need in Chinese Americans: The Chinese American Eye Study (CHES). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):3633.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To estimate the sex- and age-specific prevalence of uncorrected refractive error and unmet refractive need in adult Chinese Americans.

Methods: 4582 of 5785 (participation rate, 79.2%) self-identified Chinese Americans aged ≥ 50 years, ascertained through a population-based, door-to-door census of 15 census tracts in Monterey Park, CA, completed an in-home questionnaire and comprehensive eye exam. Binocular and monocular distance acuity with presenting correction was measured using standard Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) protocols, and automated followed by subjective refraction was performed using standard protocols (Humphrey Autorefractor; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA). Uncorrected refractive error was defined as a ≥2 line improvement with refraction in the better seeing eye. Unmet refractive need was defined as <20/40 in the better seeing eye and achieving >or=20/40 after refraction (definition 1) or having <20/40 in the better seeing eye and achieving a >or=2-line improvement with refraction (definition 2). Methods were identical to the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES).

Results: Overall prevalence of uncorrected refractive error was 17.9 (95% CI 16.8-19.0). No significant age-specific trend existed (p=0.28), nor did a male-female difference after controlling for age (p=0.10). The prevalence of unmet refractive need increased significantly with age in a dose-response fashion with both definitions (p < 0.0001), increasing from 7.6 (5.8-9.4; definition 1) and 7.9 (6.0-9.8; definition 2) among participants 50-59 years, to 18.7 (12.6-24.8; definition 1) and 20.5 (14.0-27.1; definition 2) among subjects ≥80 years. No significant male-female difference in unmet refractive need existed after controlling for age (p=0.10, definition 1; p=0.12, definition 2).

Conclusions: Data suggest a high burden of uncorrected refractive error and unmet refractive need in this cohort representative of Chinese Americans in the U.S. Overall prevalence of uncorrected refractive error and unmet refractive need is similar to LALES. These results identify a large burden of visual impairment in Chinese Americans that reduces quality of life and that can be improved with a relatively modest intervention of refraction and visual correction.

Keywords: 463 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence • 676 refraction • 605 myopia  
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