April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Effect of low-intensity ultrasound on the transscleral delivery of serum protein
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeong Hun Bae
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • HanSeok Park
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Seong Hee Shim
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Joon Mo Kim
    Department of Ophthalmology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jeong Hun Bae, None; HanSeok Park, None; Seong Hee Shim, None; Joon Mo Kim, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 448. doi:
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      Jeong Hun Bae, HanSeok Park, Seong Hee Shim, Joon Mo Kim; Effect of low-intensity ultrasound on the transscleral delivery of serum protein. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):448.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To demonstrate the effect of low-intensity ultrasound on enhancing the transscleral delivery of serum protein into the eye in vivo.

Methods: Fifteen New Zealand white rabbits received 0.1 ml of 0.1% fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) solution as a subtenon injection in both eyes. Ultrasound at 1 MHz with an intensity of 0.24 W/cm2 was applied over the injection site in the right eye for 5 minutes. The left eye served as a control. Both eyes were enucleated, and the whole vitreous was extracted from an eye. Fluorescence concentration in vitreous samples was measured. The penetration of FITC-BSA into the sclera was evaluated with the cryosectioned tissues using fluorescence microscope.

Results: The mean concentration of vitreous fluorescence was 1.367 ± 0.309 μg/ml in the ultrasound-applied group and 1.101 ± 0.240 μg/ml in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.023, Mann-Whitney U test). It was also found that the scleral penetration of FITC-BSA was increased in the ultrasound-applied group compared to the control group.

Conclusions: Low-intensity ultrasound could enhance the transscleral protein delivery into the eye, suggesting that this technique may be a useful non-invasive alternative for intraocular drug delivery.

Keywords: 503 drug toxicity/drug effects • 708 sclera • 599 microscopy: light/fluorescence/immunohistochemistry  
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