April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Using Optical Coherent Tomography (OCT) imaging to track progression and resolution of corneal infiltrates- a pilot study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ping Situ
    School of Optometry, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN
  • Carolyn G Begley
    School of Optometry, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN
  • Meredith E Jansen
    Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Jacksonville, FL
  • Xiqiao Ding
    School of Optometry, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN
  • Kathrine E Lorenz
    Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Jacksonville, FL
  • Danielle Boree
    Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Jacksonville, FL
  • Tawnya Wilson
    Johnson & Johnson Vision Care, Jacksonville, FL
  • Robin L Chalmers
    School of Optometry, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Ping Situ, Johnson & Johnson Vision Care (F); Carolyn Begley, Johnson & Johnson Vision Care (F); Meredith Jansen, Johnson & Johnson Vision Care (E); Xiqiao Ding, None; Kathrine Lorenz, Johnson & Johnson Vision Care (E); Danielle Boree, Johnson & Johnson Vision Care (E); Tawnya Wilson, Johnson & Johnson Vision Care (E); Robin Chalmers, Johnson & Johnson Vision Care (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 4637. doi:
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      Ping Situ, Carolyn G Begley, Meredith E Jansen, Xiqiao Ding, Kathrine E Lorenz, Danielle Boree, Tawnya Wilson, Robin L Chalmers; Using Optical Coherent Tomography (OCT) imaging to track progression and resolution of corneal infiltrates- a pilot study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):4637.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To determine the feasibility of developing a new evaluation method for objective tracking of the progression and resolution of corneal infiltrates using anterior segment OCT imaging

Methods: Seven soft contact lens (SCL) wearers who presented for clinical care with active symptomatic corneal infiltrates in the Indiana University Contact Lens Clinic, 2 positive control SCL wearers with established corneal scars (but no active disease), and 2 age-matched normal control SCL wearers with no corneal opacities or active disease were enrolled in the study. The active infiltrative events were observed until resolution (approximately 6 weeks). Visits for the scar and normal control groups were scheduled 6 weeks apart. Corneal images that captured infiltrate characteristics (size and depth) were captured using drawings, slit-lamp video photos and Zeiss Visante OCT imaging at each visit. Raw image data from OCT measurements were re-processed using a custom Matlab program for analysis of infiltrate size and density. Image J was applied in a selective few subjects whose images for both measurements were quantifiable to compare the infiltrate size captured by the two imaging systems.

Results: The amount of time from presentation to resolution of infiltrates based on clinical observation was 9.9 days (±SD 5.5, range 2-16). The infiltrate width measured using slit-lamp photos and OCT decreased with the event resolution while the scar and normal control groups showed no changes between initial and final visits. Measured infiltrate width was similar between slit lamp and OCT imaging methods (median 0.69 and 0.75 mm for slit-lamp photo and OCT respectively, Mann-Whitney U p>0.05), while the drawings based on clinician slit-lamp estimation tended to overestimate. Active infiltrates appeared in OCT images as high intensity loci with diffuse edges. As the infiltrate progressed to an inactive scar, the edges became distinct and intensity decreased by 57% of integrate density.

Conclusions: Results from this study suggest that both OCT and high resolution slit lamp photographs can be used to demonstrate quantifiable changes to characterize the development, progression and resolution of contact lens related corneal infiltrates. The OCT and slit-lamp photo imaging methods may provide a more precise measure than slit-lamp estimation for infiltrate documentation.

Keywords: 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical • 479 cornea: clinical science • 468 clinical research methodology  
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