April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Nailfold hemorrhages and dilated capillaries separate POAG from NTG
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul A Knepper
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
    Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL
  • Geoffrey Hill
    Department of Ophthalmology, John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL
  • Anjali S Hawkins
    Geneva Eye Clinic, Geneva, IL
    Department of Ophthalmology, Rush Medical College of Rush University, Chicago, IL
  • Christopher Wanderling
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Paulius V Kuprys
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Sean Forte
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • Chetan Velagapudi
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
  • John R Samples
    Department of Surgery, Rocky Vista University, Parker, CO
  • Michael C Giovingo
    Department of Ophthalmology, John H. Stroger, Jr. Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL
    Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA
  • Nicholas J Volpe
    Department of Ophthalmology, Northwestern University Medical School, Chicago, IL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Paul Knepper, None; Geoffrey Hill, None; Anjali Hawkins, None; Christopher Wanderling, None; Paulius Kuprys, None; Sean Forte, None; Chetan Velagapudi, None; John Samples, None; Michael Giovingo, None; Nicholas Volpe, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 4751. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Paul A Knepper, Geoffrey Hill, Anjali S Hawkins, Christopher Wanderling, Paulius V Kuprys, Sean Forte, Chetan Velagapudi, John R Samples, Michael C Giovingo, Nicholas J Volpe; Nailfold hemorrhages and dilated capillaries separate POAG from NTG. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):4751.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is an ocular disease causing the loss of vision; approximately half of POAG subjects are undiagnosed. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the incidence of nailfold hemorrhages and dilated capillaries correlate with POAG and normal tension glaucoma (NTG) visual field loss.

 
Methods
 

This study cohort consisted of NTG (n=8), POAG (n=17), and age matched caucasian control (n=29) subjects. Nailfold videos were recorded on the subjects’ third and fourth or fourth and fifth fingers of their non-dominant hand with a JH-1004 Capillaroscope. Subjects were excluded on the basis of connective tissue diseases (e.g. arthritis), autoimmune disorders, and malignancies. Videos were analyzed by a masked observer for hemorrhages, dilated capillary loops (>50um), and avascular areas (>500um). Additionally, hemorrhage count was compared to visual field loss: stage 1, normal; stage 2, early, arcuate defect; stage 3, moderate, abnormal in 1 hemifield and not within 5 degrees of fixation; and, stage 4, severe, abnormal in both hemifields or within 5 degrees of fixation. Statistical analyses were calculated using ANOVA analysis.

 
Results
 

The findings of this study are presented in the table and displayed on the regression analysis graphs.

 
Conclusions
 

All POAG and NTG patients had video documented hemorrhages and the majority of patients had dilated capillaries. A positive correlation between hemorrhage count and visual field loss was observed in POAG patients; interestingly, hemorrhage count was highest in the early stage of visual loss in NTG patients. Video capillaroscopy may provide a quick and simple test to screen patients for NTG or POAG and it may serve as an ancillary test in the management of POAG.

     
Keywords: 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical • 436 blood supply • 615 neuroprotection  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×