April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Role of O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1 in the pathogenesis of preclinical diabetic retinopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kelly Donovan
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
  • Oleg Alekseev
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
  • Qi Xin
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
  • Jane Azizkhan-Clifford
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Kelly Donovan, None; Oleg Alekseev, None; Qi Xin, None; Jane Azizkhan-Clifford, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 4911. doi:
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      Kelly Donovan, Oleg Alekseev, Qi Xin, Jane Azizkhan-Clifford; Role of O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1 in the pathogenesis of preclinical diabetic retinopathy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):4911.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Central to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy (DR) is vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A). Gene expression of VEGF-A is regulated by several transcription factors, including specificity protein 1 (Sp1). Sp1 is known to participate in angiogenesis and co-localizes with VEGF-A in the epiretinal membranes of DR patients. Sp1 is heavily O-GlcNAcylated by the enzyme O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT). This glycosylation modification affects its transcriptional activity, localization, stability, and protein interactions. Since O-GlcNAcylation of proteins is elevated under high glucose conditions, we investigated the relationship between O-GlcNAcylation of Sp1 and increased VEGF-A transcription.

Methods: Hyperglycemia-exposed ARPE-19 (retinal pigment epithelial cells) and TR-iBRB (rat retinal microendothelial cells) were assayed for VEGF-A promoter activity by luciferase assay and levels of VEGF-A by RT-qPCR and Western blot. VEGF-A protein and mRNA levels were measured in cells depleted of Sp1 or OGT by shRNA. Small molecule inhibitors of OGA and OGT were used to increase or decrease total O-GlcNAc. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to assess levels of Sp1 bound to the VEGF-A promoter.

Results: Hyperglycemia caused increased VEGF-A promoter activity, transcript and protein expression in ARPE-19 and TR-iBRB cells. OGT or Sp1 inhibition or depletion significantly abrogated these glucose-induced changes in both cell types, while minimally affecting basal expression. ChIP analysis showed that glucose increased the amount of promoter-bound Sp1.

Conclusions: Glucose-induced increases in pan O-GlcNac in the RPE and vascular retina may be participating in the aberrant expression of VEGF-A in preclinical DR. The highly O-glcosylated Sp1 transcription factor may be responsible for driving early VEGF-A production in the retina.

Keywords: 499 diabetic retinopathy • 701 retinal pigment epithelium • 657 protein modifications-post translational  
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