April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Injection frequency and anatomic outcomes one year following conversion to aflibercept in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wyatt Messenger
    Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
  • Peter Campbell
    Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
  • Ambar Faridi
    Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
    Duke Eye Center, Duke University, Durham, NC
  • Loton Shippey
    Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
  • Christina J Flaxel
    Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Wyatt Messenger, None; Peter Campbell, None; Ambar Faridi, None; Loton Shippey, None; Christina Flaxel, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 4932. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Wyatt Messenger, Peter Campbell, Ambar Faridi, Loton Shippey, Christina J Flaxel; Injection frequency and anatomic outcomes one year following conversion to aflibercept in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):4932.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To evaluate the clinical, anatomic, and functional effects of conversion to aflibercept following ranibizumab and/or bevacizumab in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

 
Methods
 

A retrospective chart review of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration treated with intravitreal ranibizumab and/or bevacizumab who were switched to aflibercept was performed. Demographic information, previous injection number and type, visual acuity, central macular thickness (CMT), presence of intraretinal fluid (IRF) or subretinal fluid (SRF), and dosing frequency were recorded. Patients were included if they had received at least one year of anti-VEGF therapy prior to the conversion and were followed for at least one year. The primary outcome was change in injection frequency in the year following the change. Secondary outcomes included change in CMT at 6 months and one year, presence of intraretinal and subretinal fluid at 6 months, and visual acuity at one year.

 
Results
 

A total of 214 eyes with neovascular AMD were switched to aflibercept during the enrollment period. Of these, 109 met inclusion criteria. Compared to the year prior to starting aflibercept, injection frequency was unchanged with patients receiving 7.4 injections the year prior to conversion compared to 7.2 injections in the year following (p=0.47). However, the change to aflibercept was associated with improvement in CMT from 324 to 295 um (P = 0.0001) at 6 months, a reduction that remained significant at one year and corresponded to more patients with fluid-free retinas at one year. There was no effect on visual acuity.

 
Conclusions
 

In our population, switching patients to aflibercept therapy was not associated with a decrease in the mean number of injections in the first year after the conversion from ranibizumab and/or bevacizumab, or improved visual acuity, but was associated with more fluid-free eyes and improved CMT at 6 months and 1 year. It is unknown whether this will translate into improved outcomes compared with continuing the same anti-VEGF agent or will decrease the number of injections in the future.

 
Keywords: 412 age-related macular degeneration • 462 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: outcomes/complications • 561 injection  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×