April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Behcet Disease in the United States: Ocular and Systemic Manifestations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Didar Ucar
    National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Monica D Dalal
    National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Austin Fox
    National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • William R Tucker
    National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Nirali Bhatt
    National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Robert B Nussenblatt
    National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • H Nida Sen
    National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Didar Ucar, None; Monica Dalal, None; Austin Fox, None; William Tucker, None; Nirali Bhatt, None; Robert Nussenblatt, None; H Nida Sen, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 5304. doi:
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      Didar Ucar, Monica D Dalal, Austin Fox, William R Tucker, Nirali Bhatt, Robert B Nussenblatt, H Nida Sen; Behcet Disease in the United States: Ocular and Systemic Manifestations. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):5304.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Behcet’s disease (BD) is uncommon in the United States (US). Prior studies have indicated different characteristics among different ethnic groups. The aim of this study is to describe demographic and clinical features, ocular and systemic manifestations in a US population with BD.

 
Methods
 

Electronic medical records of BD patients seen for ocular screening as part of an interdisciplinary clinical study (systemic cohort) and those seen as part of a natural history study for ocular disease (ocular cohort) at the National Eye Institute between 1999 and 2011 were reviewed. Data collected included demographics, clinical features, ocular and systemic manifestations. Patients were also categorized based on ethnicity into two groups: Caucasians of European descent (CEu) or Non-Caucasian or non-European descent (NCEu). Results were also compared to previously published large epidemiologic studies from different geographic regions.

 
Results
 

A total of 70 patients were identified. The mean age at diagnosis was 27.8 years, 44 were female (63%), 52 were CEu (74%), 32 (46%) were in the ocular cohort and 38 (54%) in the systemic cohort. Female-to-male (F/M) ratio in the entire cohort was 1.7; 2.0 among CEu, 1.0 among NCEu patients. HLA B51 positivity was 23% and 33% in the CEu and NCEu groups, respectively. Uveitis was slightly more common among NCEu compared to CEu patients (78% vs 67%), and posterior/panuveitis was the most common form of uveitis in all groups (71%). F/M ratio was higher in the systemic cohort (3.8) compared to ocular cohort whereas, HLA B51 positivity was higher in the ocular cohort (31%). Anterior uveitis was the most common anatomical location in the systemic cohort (53%) whereas posterior/panuveitis was the most common in the ocular cohort (88%). In terms of extraocular manifestations there was no significant difference between the ethnic categories or systemic and ocular cohorts. Compared to previous reports, F/M ratio in this study was higher and HLAB51 prevalence was lower.

 
Conclusions
 

BD in the US appears to have different clinical characteristics with more females affected and lower prevalence of uveitis as well as a lower HLAB51 prevalence among Caucasians of European descent. Posterior/panuveitis was the most common anatomical location for uveitis in the entire cohort. Extraocular manifestations were similar among different ethnic groups in the US BD patients.

 
Keywords: 746 uveitis-clinical/animal model • 461 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: natural history • 557 inflammation  
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