April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Epidemiological characteristics of Sympathetic Ophthalmia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • PABLO JOSE GUZMAN-SALAS
    INSTITUTO DE OFTALMOLOGIA “CONDE DE VALENCIANA“, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Ethel B Guinto-Arcos
    INSTITUTO DE OFTALMOLOGIA “CONDE DE VALENCIANA“, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Miguel Pedroza-Seres
    INSTITUTO DE OFTALMOLOGIA “CONDE DE VALENCIANA“, Mexico City, Mexico
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships PABLO GUZMAN-SALAS, None; Ethel Guinto-Arcos, None; Miguel Pedroza-Seres, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 5317. doi:
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      PABLO JOSE GUZMAN-SALAS, Ethel B Guinto-Arcos, Miguel Pedroza-Seres; Epidemiological characteristics of Sympathetic Ophthalmia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):5317.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Report the number of patients with Sympathetic Ophthalmia, attending a Uveitis Department in a period of time, and analyze different epidemiological characteristics of this disease.

Methods: Retrospective case series study in one academic tertiary care uveitis department with 20 patients with Sympathetic Ophthalmia from 2007 to 2013. We reviewed medical records from patients of Instituto de Oftalmologia “Conde de Valenciana“ in Mexico. We collected information of: gender, age, symptoms, type of event: trauma or surgery (type of surgery), time from event to onset of symptoms, visual acuity in both eyes in their first and last consultation, clinical findings, treatment received and progression of inciting eye to ptisis bulbi.

Results: We analyzed 20 patients, with average age of 50±19.33 years, with 65% being males. With 50% trauma, 50% surgery distribution regarding the initial event in the inciting eye. In surgery, 40% of patients had Phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation, 25% had unspecified Retinopexy procedure, and 35% got other surgical procedures. 60% of patients had a right inciting eye. 100% of cases seek consultation because of decreased vision in the sympathizing eye. Time between injury and onset of symptoms had and average of 104.45±134.41 months. 75% of patients had vision between no light perception and LogMAR 3 initially in the inciting eye, with a final vision in 90% between no light perception and LogMAR 3. Visual acuity in the sympathizing eye initially 50% between LogMAR 0 and LogMAR 0.60; the other 50% between LogMAR 0.70 and LogMAR 3. In the final visit, 60% had vision between LogMAR 0 to LogMAR 0.30. Clinical findings were variable, 100% patients showed mutton-fat keratic precipitates and anterior chamber reaction, followed by vitreitis in 60% of cases. 20 patients received Prednisolone drops, an at least 45% of cases received Methotrexate, Azathioprine or Cyclophosphamide.

Conclusions: This information helped us to better understand epidemiological characteristics of Sympathetic Ophthalmia. We had a predominant male population in their fifties, with equal distribution of trauma versus surgery, that had bad visual acuities in the inciting eye that tends to get worse, an a bad visual acuity that appears to get better with time and treatment in the sympathized eye in most cases. This is an important study because it is the first one to analyze a series of cases with this disease in Mexico.

Keywords: 745 uvea • 557 inflammation • 742 trauma  
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