April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Primary Epithelial Malignancies of the Lacrimal Gland: Trends in Survival
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maxwell Elia
    Ophthalmology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Charles Tuggle
    Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Javier Servat
    Ophthalmology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Flora Levin
    Ophthalmology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Maxwell Elia, None; Charles Tuggle, None; Javier Servat, None; Flora Levin, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 5445. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Maxwell Elia, Charles Tuggle, Javier Servat, Flora Levin; Primary Epithelial Malignancies of the Lacrimal Gland: Trends in Survival. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):5445.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To determine the trends in incidence, treatment, and survival of primary epithelial malignancies of the lacrimal gland in the United States from 1988 to 2010 using a systemic review of the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database.

 
Methods
 

One hundred and thirty-two cases of primary epithelial malignancy of the lacrimal gland were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program database in the United States from 1988 to 2010. Survival rates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and significance was determined using chi-squared testing.

 
Results
 

There were 132 cases of primary epithelial lacrimal gland tumors with histopathologic confirmation in the SEER database. The most common tumor types were adenoid cystic carcinoma (51.5%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (17.4%), adenocarcinoma in situ (15.1% ). The majority of tumors (61%) presented as locally invasive disease. The remainder, were confined to a tumor capsule (35%) or metastatic at presentation (4%). Most tumors were 2-4 cm in size at diagnosis (68%), with 19% less than 2cm and 13% greater than 4cm (13%). Surgery was the treatment of choice in 90% of patients, with 58% receiving radiation therapy (RT). There was a statistically significant improvement in survival among patients undergoing surgery versus those without surgical treatment (8.24 years vs. 1.0 year; p< 0.0001). Those undergoing radiation therapy fared poorer (2.25 years vs. 8.94 years; p = 0.02). Patients with advanced disease were significantly more likely to be treated with radiation therapy alone (70% regionally invasive or metastatic vs. 45% locally invasive; p<0.01). Patients with a history of prior malignancy had worse survival (5.3 years vs. 9.6 year; p = 0.014). There was no significant gender, age, or race predilection. There has been no significant improvement in survival between the 1988-1997 group and the 2004-2010 group (9.6 years vs. 8.36 years, p=0.77).

 
Conclusions
 

Surgery confers a statistically significant improvement in survival among patients diagnosed with primary epithelial tumors of the lacrimal gland and should remain an important tool in disease management. The SEER data demonstrates that there has been no significant improvement in survival among patients diagnosed with primary epithelial malignancies of the lacrimal gland during the period of data collection.

     
Keywords: 576 lacrimal gland • 744 tumors • 624 oncology  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×