April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Seasonality of microbial keratitis on the Federal University of Sao Paulo Ocular Microbiology Laboratory
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Fabio Iglesias Iglesias Marujo
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paulista School of Medicine, São Paulo Hospital, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Flavio E Hirai
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paulista School of Medicine, São Paulo Hospital, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Maria Cecilia Z Yu
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paulista School of Medicine, São Paulo Hospital, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Ana L Hofling-Lima
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paulista School of Medicine, São Paulo Hospital, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Denise Freitas
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paulista School of Medicine, São Paulo Hospital, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Elcio H Sato
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Paulista School of Medicine, São Paulo Hospital, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Fabio Iglesias Marujo, None; Flavio Hirai, None; Maria Cecilia Yu, None; Ana Hofling-Lima, None; Denise Freitas, None; Elcio Sato, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 5468. doi:
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      Fabio Iglesias Iglesias Marujo, Flavio E Hirai, Maria Cecilia Z Yu, Ana L Hofling-Lima, Denise Freitas, Elcio H Sato; Seasonality of microbial keratitis on the Federal University of Sao Paulo Ocular Microbiology Laboratory. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):5468.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Microbial keratitis are one of the main causes of ocular morbidity and blindness in the world, and can be caused by bacteria, fungi, protozoan, or virus. It has a higher incidence in underdeveloped countries and the main risk factors are: inadequate use of contact lenses, trauma, eye surgery, use of eye drops, foreign body, exposure to contaminated water, systemic or corneal diseases and lacrimal film or palpebral abnormalities. Clinical aspects may help to infer the etiological agent, but the microbiological exam is necessary to determine the pathogen and guide the treatment. Purpose: analyze the distribution of microbial keratitis diagnosed in the Unifesp’s Ocular Microbiology Lab.

 
Methods
 

Retrospective study, analyzing the results of microbiology exams from patients with clinically suspected microbial keratitis from 2005 to 2009 in the Ocular Microbiology Lab - Ophthalmology Dept. - Federal University of São Paulo. All microbial keratitis with culture positive for at least one of the three main agent groups: bacteria, fungi or Acanthamoeba were included. Data was divided by month, in order to study seasonality.

 
Results
 

2049 clinically suspected microbial keratitis were analyzed, 1468 (71.6%) of which presented positive cultures for at least one infectious agent (bacteria, fungi or Acanthamoeba). The mean age was 45 years old and 45% were female. Most cases, in any time of the year, were caused by bacteria (80.3%). Fungi were responsible for 7.0% and Acanthamoeba for 5.9%. There was not a wide seasonality of microbial keratitis, maybe because of the mild climate of Brazil, with similar weather throughout the year. This would explain differences between our findings and those in similar studies from other countries, like India, which connected the higher incidence of fungi keratitis to windier seasons.

 
Conclusions
 

There was not a significant seasonal variability of microbial keratitis. Isolated bacterial was the most frequent keratitis in all studied period. Fungi was the second most common, followed by Acanthamoeba.

   
Keywords: 573 keratitis • 593 microbial pathogenesis: clinical studies • 459 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: biostatistics/epidemiology methodology  
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