April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Correlates of Metabolic Syndrome Are Associated with Low Macular Pigment Despite Moderate to High Intakes of Macular Carotenoids
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristin J Meyers
    Ophthal & Visual Sciences, Univ of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI
  • Zhe Liu
    Ophthal & Visual Sciences, Univ of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI
  • Robert Wallace
    Department of Epidemiology, University of Iowa College of Public Health, Iowa City, IA
  • Lesley Tinker
    Dept. of Cancer Prevention Research Prog, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA
  • Corinne Engelman
    Dept of Population Health Sciences, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI
  • Barbara A Blodi
    Ophthal & Visual Sciences, Univ of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI
    Fundus Photograph Reading Center, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI
  • Sudha K Iyengar
    Epidemiology, Case Western University, Clevland, OH
  • Elizabeth Johnson
    Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA
  • Max Snodderly
    Department of Human Ecology, The University of Texas, Austin, TX
  • Julie A Mares
    Ophthal & Visual Sciences, Univ of Wisconsin, Madison, Madison, WI
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Kristin Meyers, None; Zhe Liu, None; Robert Wallace, None; Lesley Tinker, None; Corinne Engelman, None; Barbara Blodi, None; Sudha Iyengar, None; Elizabeth Johnson, Basuch and Lomb (S); Max Snodderly, None; Julie Mares, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 6009. doi:
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      Kristin J Meyers, Zhe Liu, Robert Wallace, Lesley Tinker, Corinne Engelman, Barbara A Blodi, Sudha K Iyengar, Elizabeth Johnson, Max Snodderly, Julie A Mares, ; Correlates of Metabolic Syndrome Are Associated with Low Macular Pigment Despite Moderate to High Intakes of Macular Carotenoids. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):6009.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Variable macular response to dietary lutein and zeaxanthin (LZ) has been reported and may explain inconsistent benefit of LZ from observational studies and clinical trials for AMD. We evaluated phenotypic and genotypic measures of metabolic syndrome, including measures of abdominal adiposity, hypertension, diabetes, elevated triglycerides, and dyslipidemia, for associations with macular response to diets containing moderate to high intakes of LZ (>1.7mg/day) in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study to the Women’s Health Initiative.

Methods: Macular pigment optical density (MPOD) was assessed using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry in 2001-2004. LZ intake was estimated from food frequency and supplement questionnaires. Visits also included anthropometric measurements and queries for chronic diseases. WHI visits (1994-1998) included blood collection for analysis of triglycerides and genotyping of variants related to carotenoid and HDL status. Among women with intake of LZ >1.7mg/day (N=867), we compared dietary, lifestyle, health status, and genotypic characteristics of women who had MPOD ranking two or more quintiles below their quintile rank for LZ intake (low responders) with characteristics of women who had MPOD which equaled or exceeded their quintile ranking for LZ intake (responders).

Results: Low responders (n=377), relative to women with MPOD which ranked similarly to their LZ intake (n=490), were more likely to have waist circumference in high quartiles (30 vs. 17%), diabetes (8 vs. 4%), hypertension (68 vs. 58%), elevated triglycerides (10 vs. 7%), and use statins (28 vs. 23%). Low responders were also more likely to have genotypes associated with low MPOD in genes which have been related to HDL: GG for BCMO1 rs11645428 (54% vs. 41%), AG/GG for SCARB1 rs838879 (60% vs. 43%), and CC for ABCA1 rs1929841 (8% vs. 3%). Considered jointly, increasing number of factors related to metabolic syndrome was associated with lower MPOD, adjusted for LZ intake (mean MPOD = 0.55, 0.45, 0.41, 0.36, 0.32, 0.34. 0.17 and 0.05 for scores of 0 to 7, respectively (P-trend<0.0001)).

Conclusions: The number of metabolic syndrome components may be a crude marker for identifying persons less likely to respond to supplements in clinical trials, or for use in comparing results within and across studies of LZ supplements.

Keywords: 587 macular pigment • 412 age-related macular degeneration • 618 nutritional factors  
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