April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Prevalence and Characterization of Epiretinal Membranes in Patients with Optic Nerve Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicole De Cuir
    Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Juliet Idiga
    Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Khushmit Kaur
    Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Jeffrey Odel
    Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Gustavo V De Moraes
    Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Robert Ritch
    New York Eye & Ear Infirmary, New York, NY
  • Donald C Hood
    Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Nicole De Cuir, None; Juliet Idiga, None; Khushmit Kaur, None; Jeffrey Odel, Bayer (C); Gustavo De Moraes, None; Robert Ritch, None; Donald Hood, Topcon, Inc. (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 6216. doi:
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      Nicole De Cuir, Juliet Idiga, Khushmit Kaur, Jeffrey Odel, Gustavo V De Moraes, Robert Ritch, Donald C Hood; Prevalence and Characterization of Epiretinal Membranes in Patients with Optic Nerve Disease. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):6216.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Because patients with optic nerve disease can exhibit ocular inflammation and it has been hypothesized that inflammation can lead to ERM formation, we compared the prevalence and characteristics of epiretinal membranes (ERM) in glaucoma patients, glaucoma suspects, patients with other optic nerve diseases, and healthy controls.

 
Methods
 

fdOCT horizontal cube scans of the macula (Topcon Inc, Japan) were obtained and examined for the presence of ERMs, which were classified as: Simple [a thickened, hyper-pigmented region of the inner limiting membrane (ILM)-see Fig. 1a] or Complex (i.e. a thickened region of the ILM that has a gap separating it from retinal nerve fiber layer, which in some cases appeared distorted-see Fig. 1b). The study population included 54 eyes of 54 control patients (52.8 ± 8.2 yrs), 75 eyes of 75 glaucoma patients (58.1 ± 11.5 yrs), 49 eyes of 49 glaucoma suspects (51.2 ± 13.4 yrs), and 56 eyes of 56 patients with other optic nerve diseases (47.32± 17.6 yrs). Glaucoma patients and suspects had glaucomatous optic neuropathy, with abnormal (glaucoma) or normal (suspects) 24-2 visual fields based upon cluster criteria. The patients with other optic nerve disease included patients with MS, ischemic optic neuropathy, and optic atrophy.

 
Results
 

Overall, 83.3% of control eyes, 60.0% of glaucomatous eyes (GL), 67.4% of glaucoma suspect eyes (GS), and 82.2% of eyes with other optic nerve disease (OND) exhibited ERMs (Table). Based upon age-adjusted logistical regression, the prevalence of ERMs in the patient groups was not significantly greater than the controls [Odds Ratio: 0.34 (G); 0.41 (GS), 0.83 (OND)]. Of note, 30 (16.7%) of the patients’ eyes, but none of the control eyes, had complex ERMs. However, only age was a statistically significant predictor of complex ERMs. Given that the control group was significantly younger than the patient groups, we cannot rule out the possibility that patients are more likely to develop complex ERMs with age.

 
Conclusions
 

The patients with optic nerve disease did not show an increased prevalence of ERMs. Complex ERMs are more likely with age and it is possible that this is even more so in patients. Older controls need to be added to test this hypothesis.

 
 
Figure. A. Two examples of a simple ERM. B. Two examples of a complex ERM.
 
Figure. A. Two examples of a simple ERM. B. Two examples of a complex ERM.
 
 
Table. Percent of eyes.
 
Table. Percent of eyes.
 
Keywords: 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical • 613 neuro-ophthalmology: optic nerve • 610 nerve fiber layer  
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