April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Suppresses Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Replication in Corneal Epithelium
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jane Azizkhan-Clifford
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
  • Oleg Alekseev
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
  • Kelly Donovan
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
  • Vladimir Limonnik
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Jane Azizkhan-Clifford, Drexel University (P); Oleg Alekseev, Drexel University (P); Kelly Donovan, Drexel University (P); Vladimir Limonnik, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 6257. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jane Azizkhan-Clifford, Oleg Alekseev, Kelly Donovan, Vladimir Limonnik; Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Suppresses Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Replication in Corneal Epithelium. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):6257.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: Herpes keratitis (HK) is the leading cause of cornea-derived and infection-associated blindness in the developed world. Despite the availability of effective antivirals, some patients develop refractory disease, drug-resistant infection, and topical toxicity. A non-pharmaceutical treatment modality may offer a unique advantage in the management of such cases. This study investigates the antiviral effect of non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma, a partially ionized gas that can be applied to organic substances to produce various biological effects.

Methods: Human corneal epithelial cells and explanted corneas were infected with HSV-1 and exposed to culture medium treated with non-thermal DBD plasma. The extent of infection was measured by plaque assay, qPCR, and Western blot. Corneal toxicity assessment was performed with fluorescein staining, histological examination, and 8-OHdG detection.

Results: Application of DBD plasma-treated medium to human corneal epithelial cells and explanted corneas produced a dose-dependent reduction of the cytopathic effect, viral genome replication, and the overall production of infectious viral progeny. Toxicity studies showed lack of detrimental effects in explanted human corneas.

Conclusions: Non-thermal DBD plasma substantially suppresses corneal HSV-1 infection in vitro and ex vivo without causing pronounced toxicity. Non-thermal plasma is a versatile tool that holds great biomedical potential for ophthalmology, where it is being investigated for wound healing and sterilization, and is already in use for ocular microsurgery. The anti-HSV-1 activity of DBD plasma demonstrated here could be directly translated to the clinic for use against drug-resistant herpes keratitis.

Keywords: 545 herpes simplex virus • 573 keratitis • 482 cornea: epithelium  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×