April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Sudden Visual Loss and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul Greenberg
    Ophthalmology Section, VA Medical Center, Providence, RI
    Division of Ophthalmology, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
  • Allison Chen
    Ophthalmology Section, VA Medical Center, Providence, RI
    Division of Ophthalmology, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
  • Jiankang Liu
    Jackson Heart Study, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS
  • Wen-Chih Wu
    Cardiology Section, VA Medical Center, Providence, RI
    Department of Medicine, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Paul Greenberg, None; Allison Chen, None; Jiankang Liu, None; Wen-Chih Wu, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 649. doi:
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      Paul Greenberg, Allison Chen, Jiankang Liu, Wen-Chih Wu; Sudden Visual Loss and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):649.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: The epidemiology of sudden visual loss (SVL) is not well described. This study examined the prevalence and cardiovascular correlates of self-reported SVL in the cohort of African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS).

Methods: The study population comprised the cohort of 5,301 patients enrolled from 2000-2004 in the JHS, a 12-year population-based observational study of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM) in African Americans. On the baseline exam (Visit 1), participants underwent clinical exams, provided blood samples and medical and health histories, which included a stroke symptoms form with a query on SVL, and completed psychosocial assessments. Visit 1 data was analyzed to obtain the estimated prevalence of SVL and its risk factors. Regression modeling was used to identify independent correlates of SVL.

Results: There were 5262 participants included in the study; 63% (3334/5262) were female. The prevalence of SVL was 3.6% (193/5262) overall and 8.7% (84/965) in patients with DM. Significant correlates of SVL included coronary heart disease (OR, 1.69 [95%CI, 1.12-2.56]), cerebrovascular disease (OR, 2.81 [95%CI, 1.76-4.47]), DM (OR, 2.85 [95% CI, 2.05-3.94]), hypertension (OR, 1.64 [95%CI, 1.09-2.45]), female gender (OR, 1.82 [95%CI: 1.24-2.67]) and income less than $50,000 (OR, 2.05 [95%CI: 1.28-3.30].

Conclusions: Self-reported sudden visual loss was significantly associated with DM, CVD and socioeconomic status in this cohort of African Americans. Further study is needed to better define the causes of and visual impairment from SVL in this population.

Keywords: 463 clinical (human) or epidemiologic studies: prevalence/incidence  
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