April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
qCSF in Clinical Applications: Efficient Characterization and Classification of Contrast Sensitivity Functions in Aging
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Wuli Jia
    Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • Fangfang Yan
    Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
    University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • Fang Hou
    Laboratory of Brain Processes (LOBES), Departments of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, OH
  • Zhong-Lin Lu
    Laboratory of Brain Processes (LOBES), Departments of Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, OH
  • Chang-Bing Huang
    Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Wuli Jia, None; Fangfang Yan, None; Fang Hou, None; Zhong-Lin Lu, Adaptive Sensory Technology (I), Adaptive Sensory Technology (P); Chang-Bing Huang, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 762. doi:
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      Wuli Jia, Fangfang Yan, Fang Hou, Zhong-Lin Lu, Chang-Bing Huang; qCSF in Clinical Applications: Efficient Characterization and Classification of Contrast Sensitivity Functions in Aging. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):762.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Sensitivity to luminance changes, or contrast sensitivity, is a fundamental visual function. The contrast sensitivity function (CSF), delineating contrast sensitivity over a wide range of spatial frequencies, provides a comprehensive characterization of spatial vision and a sensitive test for many physiological and pathological processes. Precise CSF measurements using the conventional psychophysical methods often take a long time and are impractical for clinical applications in special populations. In the current study, we tested whether the newly developed qCSF method (Lesmes, et al, 2010), taking about five minutes, can rapidly, reliably, and effectively evaluate CSFs in the aging population.

Methods: Five young (age: 22.6±1.4 yrs) and eight old (age: 69.3±1.3 yrs) subjects participated in the experiment. All subjects had been screened for ophthalmological and mental diseases. They were tested using the conventional method that measures individual contrast thresholds in a number of spatial frequency conditions using the phi method (Kontsevich&Tyler, 1998), and the qCSF which combines Bayesian adaptive inference with an information gain strategy to directly estimate four parameters that defines the observer’s CSF.

Results: Our results showed that the CSF derived from the qCSF method well matched with that from the traditional phi method (young: F(1,4)=5.442, p>0.05); old:F(1,7)=1.462, p>0.10)and the test-retest reliability were exceptionally great(young:F(1,4)=1.329, p>0.10); old: (F(1,7)=0.297, p>0.10).More importantly, the qCSF method is sensitive to the CSF difference between the young and old groups (F(1,11)=9.714, p<0.01).

Conclusions: Aging significantly degrades contrast sensitivity. TheqCSF method can reliably and effectively measure CSFs in the aging population.

Keywords: 414 aging: visual performance • 478 contrast sensitivity  
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