April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Quick measurements of contrast sensitivity in the peripheral visual field
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert Rosén
    R&D, Abbott Medical Optics, Groningen, Netherlands
    Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Linda Lundstrom
    Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Abinaya Venkataraman
    Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Simon Winter
    Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Peter Unsbo
    Applied Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Robert Rosén, Abbott Medical Optics (E); Linda Lundstrom, None; Abinaya Venkataraman, None; Simon Winter, None; Peter Unsbo, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 763. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Robert Rosén, Linda Lundstrom, Abinaya Venkataraman, Simon Winter, Peter Unsbo; Quick measurements of contrast sensitivity in the peripheral visual field. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):763.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

Measuring the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) in the periphery is complicated. The long measurement time has precluded all but the most determined subjects. The aim of this study was to implement and evaluate a faster routine, based on the quick-CSF method (qCSF, Lesmes et al. 2010), that works in the periphery. Additionally, normative data is presented on neurally limited CSFs in different peripheral field directions.

 
Methods
 

Precision and accuracy of the modified qCSF was tested for a total of six conditions (subject 1 at 20 degrees, subject 2 at 10, 20 and 30 degrees and subject 3 at 20 degrees with and without 2 D of defocus). Precision was evaluated using 8 qCSF measurements with 200 trials at each condition. Accuracy was estimated by comparing the qCSF results with those of a more traditional way to measure the CSF. In the second part of the study, we collected CSFs for six persons in the 20 degrees nasal, temporal, inferior and superior visual field using three qCSF measurements with 100 trials at each location. All measurements were performed in an adaptive optics system running in continuous closed loop (Rosén et al. 2011).

 
Results
 

A peripheral qCSF measurement using 100 trials can be performed in three minutes. On average, it has a precision of 0.12 log units for estimates of contrast sensitivity at individual spatial frequencies. This can be decreased to 0.07 log units if three qCSF measurements are taken. Average accuracy compared to the traditional way of measuring CSF was 0.08 log units, with no systematic error. An example of the precision and accuracy estimates for one of the measurement conditions can be seen in Figure 1. The results of the second experiment are shown in Figure 2. Tukey HSD test showed significant differences (p<0.05) between all field directions, except between nasal and temporal field. Contrast sensitivity was higher in the two horizontal field directions. In the vertical directions, the inferior field had a better CSF than the superior.

 
Conclusions
 

The modified qCSF method gives a precise and accurate way to measure the peripheral CSF, substantially decreasing the measurement time needed. This allows hitherto unfeasible studies using more subjects.

 
 
Figure 1. Precision and accuracy for one of the testing conditions, subject 2 at 20 degrees.
 
Figure 1. Precision and accuracy for one of the testing conditions, subject 2 at 20 degrees.
 
 
Figure 2. Average CSF in the different field directions at 20 degrees for the six subjects.
 
Figure 2. Average CSF in the different field directions at 20 degrees for the six subjects.
 
Keywords: 478 contrast sensitivity • 758 visual fields • 626 aberrations  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×