April 2014
Volume 55, Issue 13
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   April 2014
Single Beam Frequency Flickering Analysis of the Stiles-Crawford Effect of the First Kind
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Benjamin Lochocki
    AOI Group, School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • Brian Vohnsen
    AOI Group, School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Benjamin Lochocki, None; Brian Vohnsen, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 2014, Vol.55, 777. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Benjamin Lochocki, Brian Vohnsen, ; Single Beam Frequency Flickering Analysis of the Stiles-Crawford Effect of the First Kind. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2014;55(13):777.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: The photoreceptors are the last optical elements of the eye that connect the retinal image to neural responses following absorption. Therefore, studying the function of the retina plays a key role to enhance understanding of the visual process and for further development of eye modeling. This study is aimed at examining the temporal responses of cone photoreceptors using a flickering single beam Maxwellian view setup at different frequencies.

Methods: The Stiles-Crawford effect (SCE) of the first and second kind are commonly analysed using a constant reference beam and a separated path for a tuneable traversing probe beam when determining subjective visibility. Here, a compact single beam flickering system with tuneable crystal filters for wavelength and brightness control in conjunction with two galvanometric scanning mirrors has been developed. This automated approach allows individual defocus correction at any wavelength and scanning across the full pupil along a line at any angle in the pupil plane and at various flicker frequencies.

Results: The experimental results confirm an impact of frequency on the directionality of the SCE for all subjects which can be related to the response time of the visual pigments. The determined directionality at low frequencies is reduced whereas at higher frequencies the directionality agrees well compared to a bipartite field setup. Additionally, we analysed and compared our obtained data for the hue shift of the SCE of the second kind to previous studies.

Conclusions: Using the methodology, we are able to explore photoreceptor directionality and the temporal responses of the cone pigments in a novel way, giving insight into photoreceptor alignment and vision for improved optical design. The chosen methodology allows also examination of any transient SCE by sequentially entering the eye pupil at opposite sites from the point of maximum visibility.

Keywords: 649 photoreceptors: visual performance • 648 photoreceptors  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×