June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Tissue small vessel pulse amplitude differentiates between the cup, neuroretinal rim and retina in normal eyes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward Dervan
    Ophthalmology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia
  • William Huxley Morgan
    Lions Eye Institute, Perth, WA, Australia
  • Anmar Abdul-Rahman
    Ophthalmology, Manukau SuperClinic, Auckland, New Zealand
  • Dao-Yi Yu
    Ophthalmology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia
  • Martin Hazelton
    Statistics and Bioinformatics, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
  • Brigid Betz-Stablein
    Statistics and Bioinformatics, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand
  • Christopher Lind
    Neurofinity, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia
  • Geoff Chan
    Lions Eye Institute, Perth, WA, Australia
  • Johnathan Lam
    Lions Eye Institute, Perth, WA, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Edward Dervan, None; William Morgan, None; Anmar Abdul-Rahman, None; Dao-Yi Yu, None; Martin Hazelton, None; Brigid Betz-Stablein, None; Christopher Lind, None; Geoff Chan, None; Johnathan Lam, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 1020. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Edward Dervan, William Huxley Morgan, Anmar Abdul-Rahman, Dao-Yi Yu, Martin Hazelton, Brigid Betz-Stablein, Christopher Lind, Geoff Chan, Johnathan Lam; Tissue small vessel pulse amplitude differentiates between the cup, neuroretinal rim and retina in normal eyes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):1020.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: <br /> Optic disk venous pulsation is a common and useful sign. We explored the presence and distribution of tissue small vessel pulsation in the optic cup, neuroretinal rim and retina in normal subjects to discern if features may be used to differentiate the neural tissue from non-neural tissue in the optic disk.

Methods: <br /> We used a novel technique utilizing high resolution video recordings of the optic disk and retina, timed to the cardiac cycle, that measures the fluctuating haemoglobin light absorption during pulsation. This produces a densitometry map containing the amplitude of pulsation at individual pixel points. This was correlated with images segmented into neuroretinal rim, retina, optic cup and retinal tissue by an independent observer. All visible retinal vessels were excluded from the analysis.

Results: <br /> The video recordings of 6 normal eyes from 6 subjects were analyzed. We used a linear mixed model comparing the amplitude between 3 regions, allowing for distance from the disk centre and including a random factor to account for multiple measurements from individual patients. There was a significant difference in pulse amplitude between the cup (mean 1.35 ± SD 1.26) and the neuroretinal rim (mean 2.33 ± SD 1.35)(p=0.0000) and the retina (mean 2.36 ± SD 1.45)(p=0.0000) and also between the retina and neuroretinal rim (p=<0.001).

Conclusions: <br /> Tissue small vessel pulse amplitudes are significantly lower in the disk cup compared to neuroretinal tissue. This feature may be useful in following changes in glaucoma and other optic neuropathy patients.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×