June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Static Perimetry in the Visual Field Far Periphery in Optic Nerve Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Johnathan Schnee Fagg
    Ophthalmology, University of Iowa-Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA
  • Trina Eden
    Ophthalmology, University of Iowa-Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA
  • Kimberly Woodward
    Ophthalmology, University of Iowa-Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA
  • Chris A Johnson
    Ophthalmology, University of Iowa-Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA
  • Michael Wall
    Ophthalmology, University of Iowa-Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Johnathan Fagg, None; Trina Eden, None; Kimberly Woodward, None; Chris Johnson, None; Michael Wall, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 1057. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Johnathan Schnee Fagg, Trina Eden, Kimberly Woodward, Chris A Johnson, Michael Wall; Static Perimetry in the Visual Field Far Periphery in Optic Nerve Disease. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):1057.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: To determine if visual field testing in the far periphery is feasible and is a sensitive perimetric test to detect visual loss compared with the 24-2 SITA Standard test in patients with glaucoma and idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH).

Methods: We tested one eye of 29 subjects, 12 with glaucoma and 17 with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (mean deviation < -4 dB) with SITA Standard size III for the central visual field and from 30° to 60° with full threshold 60-4 using Goldmann stimulus sizes V and VI for the peripheral field. Superior and nasal edge 60-4 test locations were not used due to high retest variability giving 52, 24-2 test locations and 49 locations for the 60-4 test. Pointwise probability plots for all three tests were generated based on 60 normals tested twice. The number of abnormal test locations for the tests were weighted based on significance level using the method of Asman et al. 1992, summed and compared using ANOVA.

Results: We found 25.4% more abnormal test locations with size V in the far periphery compared to size III ( p =< 0.001). There were similar numbers of abnormal test locations in similar spatial locations with size III and size VI testing. There were five cases (3 glaucoma and 2 IIH) with normal central visual field testing and abnormalities of the far periphery.

Conclusions: Threshold static automated perimetry shows visual field defects in the peripheral field when central visual field testing is normal. Static threshold perimetry of the far periphery shows promise for detecting visual loss in glaucoma and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×