June 2015
Volume 56, Issue 7
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2015
Intraocular pressure (IOP) response to acute stress in non-human primates (NHPs)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Turner
    Vision Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
  • Christopher A Girkin
    Ophthalmology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
  • J Crawford C Downs
    Ophthalmology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Daniel Turner, None; Christopher Girkin, None; J Crawford Downs, MSD Korea (R)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2015, Vol.56, 118. doi:
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      Daniel Turner, Christopher A Girkin, J Crawford C Downs; Intraocular pressure (IOP) response to acute stress in non-human primates (NHPs). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2015;56(7 ):118.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To study the effect of stress induced changes in IOP in NHPs using continuous bilateral IOP telemetry.

 
Methods
 

IOP, heart rate (HR), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded at six event-based time points during our anesthetic injection protocol using a previously validated implantable telemetry system that wirelessly records 500 measurements per second of bilateral IOP and aortic blood pressure (IOVS 52(10):7365-75) in 3 young rhesus macaques ages 3-6 years. Data were collected before entering the outer doors of the NHP holding room as a baseline, after entering the outer and inner doors, after being squeezed in the cage for anesthetic injection, after intramuscular (IM) injection, and after the squeeze cage was released.

 
Results
 

IOP, MAP, and HR all increased rapidly and significantly by 27%, 38%, 34%, respectively, in anticipation of anesthetic induction (Table: bottom). The response was individual specific, with IOP increasing as much as 34%, 41%, and 62% above baseline in the three NHPs, respectively.

 
Conclusions
 

IOP in NHPs increases rapidly and significantly in anticipation of human interaction, and these changes occur within 20-30 seconds. IOP exhibits dynamic behavior in response to human interaction.  

 
Top: Time course for event-based measurements. Middle: Graph of mean percent difference from baseline for 3 NHPs showing IOP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR). Bottom: Table with mean percent differences among 3 NHPs at different time points.
 
Top: Time course for event-based measurements. Middle: Graph of mean percent difference from baseline for 3 NHPs showing IOP, mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR). Bottom: Table with mean percent differences among 3 NHPs at different time points.

 
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